Copyright Outside of the Classroom

Publishing and author's rights

Copyright grants you exclusive rights over all of your original works (literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and other intellectual works) whether published or unpublished. Before you sign a publication contract, however, you should be aware of which rights, if any, you might be relinquishing. Review your contract to ensure that you can share your work with colleagues and students, post your work online, or publish in the Digital Commons.

For more information, read SPARC Author Rights & Author Addendum http://sparcopen.org/our-work/author-rights/

Downloading music and video

YOU CAN
   • download music legally

YOU CANNOT
   • download anything when you know doing so is illegal
   • circumvent any DRM (Digital Rights Management) technologies
   • make copyrighted songs and movies available to others for downloading
   • use peer-to-peer file sharing applications to distribute or provide
      access to copyrighted material

Screening videos on campus

YOU CAN
   • view streaming videos from Library databases on personal or College computers
   • view a video/DVD in a private viewing room with up to 3 other people
   • view videos with public performance rights in groups greater than 4 people

YOU CANNOT
   • download anything when you know doing so is illegal
   • circumvent any DRM (Digital Rights Management) technologies
   • publicly show DVDs purchased (or borrowed) for "home use only"
      without securing public performance rights

Public Performance Rights (PPR) are the legal rights to publicly show a film or video (media). Normally the media producer or distributor manages these rights. The rights-holder can assign PPR to others through a Public Performance License.
To inquire about securing PPR, please contact contact the Library's Copyright Liaison

For more information on libraries and video copyright, see http://libguides.ala.org/copyright/video

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