COD Library Blog

Photo History Podcasts

curto.jpgLearn the history of photography using COD's Apple Distinguished Educator Jeff Curto's History of Photography Podcasts.

These podcasts are recorded during History of Photography course lectures. Originally intended for students in the class, thousands of people around the world have found the podcasts useful to their education as photographers.

As each of the current semester's class sessions occur, the corresponding podcast from the previous semester is replaced by the new one. Therefore, there is always a "full semester" of podcasts available on these blog pages and on iTunes.

American Pavilion Information Sessions

ampv.pngThe American Pavilion will be on campus Tuesday, October 8th discussing their programs and opportunities. The American Pavilion is the center of activity at the Cannes International Film Festival for the American film community, offering membership for professionals, provocative and insightful programming, immersive student programs, the Emerging Filmmaker Showcase and they offer student programs in Los Angeles and Venice, Italy. This informational session(s) is open for everyone to attend.

Date: Tuesday, October 8th
Time: 11:30 am & 1 pm
Location: MAC 175

Highlights of the American Pavilion's offerings include:

  • Cannes and Venice programs allow students to participate in two of the film industry's most important international festivals, and provide unparalleled opportunities to see films from all over the world.
  • Hospitality Program affords interested students the opportunity to learn about event planning and management at the world's largest and most glamorous event.
  • Los Angeles program is targeted to students planning a career in the industry in Hollywood.

Media History Project: Online Access to the Histories of Cinema, Broadcasting & Sound

media history project logo
The Media History Project is a remarkable non-profit initiative "dedicated to digitizing collections of classic media periodicals that belong in the public domain for full public access." To date, their online collection includes over 800,000 pages, covering entire runs of trade papers and fan magazines including Variety, Photoplay and Radio Age.

Collections span several categories, genres and dates:

  • Hollywood Studio System Collection (1914-1948)
  • Fan Magazine Collection (1911-1963)
  • Early Cinema Collection (1903-1928)
  • Year Book Collection (1916-1964)
  • Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Collection (1896-1964)
  • Non-Theatrical Film Collection (1918-1973)
  • Technical Journals Collection (1924-1954)
  • Government & Law Collection (1912-1995)
  • Global Cinema Collection (1904-1957)

This exciting resource can serve a wide variety of interests, disciplines and audiences. Whether you're a fan, a student or a history buff, the Media History Project will have you browsing for hours!
Visit now at http://mediahistoryproject.org/

Webinar: Using Open Education Resources to Strengthen Teaching

Intrigued by the opportunities offered by open access resources? Set aside some time this Thursday at 3 p.m. to attend the free webinar, Using Open Education Resources to Strengthen Teaching, presented by the director of Open Education Resources at Tacoma Community College.

Participants in this webinar will learn about Open Education Resources (OERs) and how remix culture can enliven the learning experience. An OER is a resource that is free to revise, remix, and distribute freely to students. The flexible nature of OERs mean that they can be adapted to specific learning objectives and instructor style. The freedom of OERs is enriched when coupled with strong course design and effective use of delivery tools such as a learning management system. Attend this webinar to learn how to use OERs in your teaching and learning.

Learn more and register at: http://ww2.instructure.com/using-open-education-resources-to-strengthen-...

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Your Guide to Exploring the Public Domain

Public Domain
Although not a single work in the United States will have its copyright expire until 2019, the public domain is a treasure trove of creative works freely available for use-- to remix, to share, to perform, to display.

As a vast collection of our cultural history, the public domain can be a challenge to navigate. If you're anything like me, you might dive into a compilation like The Commons only to come up for air 2 hours later realizing that you forgot your original purpose but discovered something new and fascinating.

Enter The Public Domain Review, an online project of the Open Knowledge Foundation, "dedicated to showcasing the most interesting and unusual out-of-copyright works available online." Whether you're looking for images, film, audio or text to include in a course or project or keen to read articles from scholars, writers and archivists revisiting older materials with fresh perspectives, The Public Domain Review represents a lively and engaging guide to our cultural heritage and vehicle for exposing us to the odd, the forgotten and the fascinating.

Web-Based Polygonal Modeling with three.js

Whoa! three.js enables "developers with little 3-D and WebGL experience to create incredibly sophisticated scenes using common JavaScript practices. Simply being knowledgable in JavaScript and the basics of modeling is more than enough to get started."

Smashing Magazine has a nice introduction to this revolutionizing JavaScript library that makes it easy to create and experiment with web-based 3-D scenes.

3-D simulation

Emerging Photographer: Sara Cwynar

The New Yorker has named Sara Cwyner the latest of their "emerging photographers".

Says Cwynar:

I am interested in recreating certain familiar aspects of product shots and commercial still-lives. The reproduction of detail, for example, or a specific style of lighting. I take a lot of inspiration from old studio photos and how what is once fashionable or forward-looking can come to look absurd with changing styles. Equally, I am interested in contemporary studio photography; the hyper-real, retouched images that we see everywhere. I want everything in my pictures to be intentionally unpolished, filled with mistakes, and tactile: the opposite of a clean, commercial image.

Sara Cwynar image

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