chemistry

Chemistry 1551: Jarman

renewable energy on a midwestern farm.jpg
Welcome! Click on a tab below to find books, articles, and websites for use in this course.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of these resources from off campus.

Questions? Feel free to contact me, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat Want to know more about the COD library? Check out our orientation video.

Image Credit: USDA: Renewable Energy on a Midwestern Farm
  1. Background
  2. Books & Articles
  3. Websites
  4. Cite
  5. Video Help

Pick a Topic

Your professor has given you some broad categories to start off your research, but you'll want to narrow these down before you get too deeply into your project. This will help you to be able to focus in on one topic that you'll be able to explore in 90 seconds. Start by looking through some of the websites below. Check out resources, research, or past projects links to get ideas of specific projects to explore.

Once you have a topic, use special sources to get more background information on your topic:

  • Gale Virtual Reference Library will provide online encyclopedia are both good sources of information and can help answer beginning questions ("What are some current sources of biofuels?"
  • CQ Researcher in addition to much of the info in Gale, CQ Researcher will provide summaries of arguments being made about current topics.

Find Books

Our library catalog contains our books, our DVDs and other physical items.

Search by topic, such as "Urban Sustainability."

Once you've gotten a list of titles, click on the title and then on "Description" to get more information about it. When you've pulled up the description, you'll want to look at the Table of Contents (#2) and the Subject Headings (#3), which will allow you to see if the book is focused on your topic and help you find similar titles.

chemi1551catalog.PNG

Find Articles

Next, head to a database:

Once you have a concrete question, head to a library database in order to find current articles, both popular and scholarly. The best bets for your topic are:

Academic Search Complete: ASC offers a wide variety of topics with a wide variety of types of sources (newspapers, magazines, scholarly articles.) It's a good place to look for anything with a current focus (such as Fukushima Daiichi), but be sure to know what you're looking at.

Science Direct: SD contains only scientific scholarly articles. Be sure to select "Subscribed Journals" while searching, and use Gale as necessary in order to get more information about any topics you may have questions about.

You're also welcome to explore our other science databases for more information.

Use Websites

Once you've scoped out other sources of information, take a look at websites to see if you can find more current information.

Government sites in particular can be a wonderful source of statistical data as well as a place to find directions of future research. When you search government sites, be careful to look for a site menu-- and then look for "data," "statistics," or other words that indicate something helpful. You can restrict your search to government websites only in Google by adding site:.gov to your search.

Evaluating Websites

While you're doing Google searches to either narrow your topic or in order to dig up more information on certain subject, you want to be careful to decide if the information you find is trustworthy.

When it comes to science, nearly everyone has opinions: are we getting enough Vitamin D? What will fracking do for our economy or our groundwater supply? Your job is to evaluate the information you can find through Google to find the good websites--those written by authors you can trust, with good and up-to-date information.

Authorship: Who created this website? What is their background on the topic? Are they trustworthy?

Bias: Why was the website created? What point of view does the author have? Does that limit the facts they present or how the facts are presented?

Date: How old is the information that is presented? Is it still accurate?

Questions? Check out the COD Library's guide to evaluating information.

Cite Sources

Find directions about how to cite your sources on the library citation guide.

You can also always check out the Purdue OWL website, which has MLA and APA citation guides.

Finally, you are welcome to use NoodleBib if you'd like to use a program to create and organize your citations. You must "Create a New Folder" when you use NoodleBIB for the first time. Click on "I am citing a(n):," choose the type of item you are citing, and then fill in the online form. Your bibliography will be formatted for you.

Video Help

Need to borrow a camera from the library, or want video, sound, or image editing help? Check out the library's Media Lab. The lab loans out all kinds of technology,and you'll also be able to get help using specialty software whenever the lab is open.

You'll need to reserve a workstation on the Media Lab homepage when you plan to drop in.

Want some extra help in learning how to use software or hardware before you come in? Create a Lynda account to access hours of (short) videos explaining how to use software such as Premier Pro.

Searching SciFinder

SciFInder logo.PNG
SciFinder is an advanced organic chemistry database that will allow you to search by molecule name, CAS #, formula, or even by molecular structure used by professors, graduate students, and research chemists. SciFinder does not contain the full text of scholarly articles, so you'll want to use the Journal Locator and ILL to retrieve articles that are important to you.

Details and Registration

In order to use SciFinder, you will need to register for an account with your COD email. You can see this file for help with registration.

Once you've registered an account, you can login to SciFinder and begin your work.

See the login link.

Searching SciFinder by Topic

You can search SciFinder in a variety of different ways. The first is to do a traditional search by topic. Click in the searchbox and type a phrase related to your search. See an example of a topic search here.

After you click search, SciFinder will attempt to refine your search. For example, for the search above, SciFinder presents me with the following options:

biodegradation2.PNG

As you can see, the first two options are probably the best for my search:

  • 249 references were found containing "biodegradation of oil" as entered is showing me the articles that contain my search terms as a phrase.
  • 11481 references were found containing the two concepts "biodegradation" and "oil" closely associated with one another shows me the number of articles that have both biodegration and oil as closely related important topics.

Select the best option for your search and click "Get References."

At this point, you have some options to refine your search. The Refine box on the left of the screen will allow you to narrow your results by year, topic, or document type. You can also begin to click on article titles that sound interesting. Remember, SciFinder will usually not have articles in full-text. You'll want to begin your research early enough to use Journal Locator and ILL to hunt down the articles you need.

Searching by Molecule Name, Formula, CAS#, or Structure

On the initial search page, look for the Substances heading in the box to the left.

SciFinder2.PNG

Note that here, you can select several options that will help you to learn more about a substance. For example, after selecting Substance Identifier I could type in Diphenhydramine, the brand name of the active ingredient in Benadryl, or one of the many other names the molecule has. I could also type 58-73-1, the CAS registry number for the substance.

Once I've selected the right substance from the options that appear, you'll notice that you can discover a lot of information about the substance, including:

  • formula
  • molecular weight
  • melting and boiling point
  • density
  • other names for the substance
  • experimental properties
  • experimental spectra (complete with article references)
  • regulatory information by country
  • much more info

Click on a reference for any one of these properties to be connected to the full abstract of the article.
SciFinder3.PNG

Interlibrary Loan

Want to follow up on a SciFinder reference and read the full article? Start by checking our journal locator to be sure that the article isn't just in another of our databases. Type in the journal name to see if we have access to the journal, and if so, for which dates.

For journal articles, bibliographic citations in the chemical literature tend to give abbreviated titles. Talk to Laura if you need help finding the full journal title when requesting an article. This guide to chemistry journal abbreviations from University of British Columbia may also be helpful.

Still not finding your article?

Use Interlibrary Loan to get books and articles from other libraries. For books, be sure to get author, title and date whenever possible.

Tags: 

CHEM 2552: Named Reaction

test molecules.jpg
Welcome! You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of the resources below from off campus.

Questions about anything on this page? Feel free to use my contact info to the right, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat.

Image Credit: Ivan S. Ufimtsev, Stanford University; Image created using VMD
  1. Find Your Reaction
  2. History
  3. Methodology and Results
  4. Articles
  5. Future Studies/Experimental
  6. Spectra
  7. Cite

Before We Get Started

chemical info for chemists.PNG
Looking for a general book that explains how to conduct chemistry research? Check out Chemical Information for Chemists: A Primer. We have two copies, one in reference, and one in general, and the book covers patent searching, physical data, reaction searching, and many other topics of interest for chemistry research.

SciFInder logo.PNG

You will also want to create a SciFinder Account in order to do much of your research for this project. Follow the directions on the linked page to get started, and contact me if you have any questions about setting up an account or searching.

Find Your Reaction

You can use the sources here to find a reaction of interest, get general information about the reaction, and answer questions about the reaction and its mechanism. Struggling to find a reaction to write about? Try the following steps:

Use a Library Book

We have several organic chemistry textbooks on reserve and in the general collection. Skim through the index to see named reactions listed. Browse the general collection around QD 251.2 and QD 261 or search the catalog. You can also search for "name reaction" OR "named reaction" in the catalog.

Need help finding a textbook?
Click on the Catalog link at the top of this screen, and
1) type in "organic chemistry textbook."
2) Select "Books & e-books."
3) Select "COD Library Only."
name_reaction2.PNG

Use Google

Choose a molecule of interest and see if there is a named reaction that makes it. Search in Google: name of molecule and reaction to synthesize or reaction to produce. Be sure that your molecule is the product of a reaction and that it is a NAMED reaction.

name_reaction1.PNG

Name-Reaction.com

While Name-Reaction.com doesn't have most of the info you'll need for your report, it does have a long list of named reactions and short info about them that is easily browseable.

Finding Historical Information:

Macmillan Encyclopedia of Chemistry: Reference QD 4 .M33 1997. 4 vols.
Check this encyclopedia for articles on many named reactions. You'll find basic descriptions and illustration of reaction mechanism to description, illustration, history, substrate, and reaction conditions.

Top Drugs: Their History, Pharmacology, Syntheses: On Reserve: RS420 .L535 2015
This book shares the chemistry behind 10 prominent drugs, including the product history, the mechanism of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR), bioavailability, metabolism, toxicology, the discovery route, and the process route.

Contemporary Drug Synthesis: On Reserve: RS403 .C667 2004.
Slightly older book, but still helpful: use the index to ID where your reaction is named in the synthesis of a drug. Great resource for identifying a product. Includes structure of drug, use of the drug, illustration of the synthesis of a drug. Make sure to check the list of references for potential additional sources.

Strategic Applications of Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis by Laszlo Kurti and Barbara Czako on Reserve: QD262 .K86 2005
This book provides a lot of helpful information, including a description, a description/illustration of a mechanism, utility (examples of drugs/chemicals produced, including descriptions and illustrations), and a list of references organized by type.

Name Reactions. 5th ed. by Jie Jack Li. Reference: QD291 .L5 2014 and (4th Ed. Online)
Mechanisms of the reaction are illustrated, examples of the reaction using specific reagents and conditions. Includes original publication identifying the reaction (written by scientist who discovered it.)

Credo will also often give you information about the background of an experiment (though not in as much detail.)

Still can't find the info you need? Try our Chem 2552 Course Reserves list.

History

Dictionary of Scientific Biography 18 vols. Reference Q 141 .D5
This is your best bet for historical information on your scientist. Use index in volume 16 to find biographical information on the person the reaction is named for. Review bibliography for additional sources.

Cambridge Dictionary of Scientists Online.

Great Chemists Reference QD 21 .F35

The Biographical Dictionary of Scientists: Chemists Reference QD 21 .B48

Methodology and Results: Including Safety, Health, and Environmental Effects

Use any of the following resources, both online and in print, to discover xxperimental, health and environmental data for your reaction product.

March's Advanced Organic Chemistry On Reserve: QD251.2 .M37 2013
Provides a description/illustration of a mechanism with detailed description of various reaction conditions, and also criteria for and examples of good reagents.

Hazardous Chemicals Desk Reference. Reference T 55.3 .H3 L49
Start at the introduction to make sense of the entries. Safety info here as well.

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. Online and in Reference T 55.3 .H3 N56
Chemical/physical properties, with personal protection and other safety info listed.

Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials. 5 vols. Reference T 55.3 .H3 539 2012 and Online
Entries are organized alphabetically by DPIM Entry code. Use the index in volume 1 to locate your molecule. Check the introduction (p. xi) to make sense of your entry.

Comprehensive Toxicology Online.
Provides explanation of the effects of chemical and physical agents on biological systems.

Micromedex. Includes links to Physicians Desk Reference, USP DI and many other drug sources as well as toxicology and other health effects and sometimes MSDS

HAZMAT Zone Use this database to look up safety information on MSDS Data Sheets. Only one user at a time may access this database. User Name: codlib Password: library

Google

Still not finding what you need? Try Google. It can be useful to put quotation marks around phrases: "Cannizzaro Reaction," "benzoic acid". Add more specific terms: nmr, uv, history, safety...

If you want laboratory information from university chemistry departments, add this string: site:.edu Often, there are laboratory procedures for synthesis or background information on a reaction or molecule.

Chemical Literature

Use the databases to shore up any gaps in your research so far. See examples below.

Scifinder will allow you to search by the name of your reaction or the product. Do a "research topic" search and then limit your results by date. Remember that citation information is located to the right of the screen in SciFinder.

Medline Lists research articles from chemical, medical and environmental journals. Most specific search is Advanced search: use CAS registry number and change format from Keyword to Chemical Substance.

Science Direct Search reaction name or chemical synthesized. be sure to choose "Subscribed journals" in center of page. Almost all titles retrieved will be fulltext.

Academic Search Complete Use advanced search to link terms (named reaction and molecule synthesized or name of product and environment*...) Choose Scholarly publications. Not everything will result in fulltext but several ACS publications are indexed. Go to local college libraries or order articles on interlibrary loan.

Interlibrary Loan

Not finding the article you want in full-text online? Start by checking our journal locator to be sure that the article isn't just in another of our databases. Type in the journal name to see if we have access to the journal, and if so, for which dates.

For journal articles, bibliographic citations in the chemical literature tend to give abbreviated titles. Talk to Laura if you need help finding the full journal title when requesting an article. Guide to chemistry journal abbreviations from University of British Columbia will be helpful.

Still not finding your article?

Use Interlibrary Loan to get books and articles from other libraries. For books, be sure to get author, title and date whenever possible.

Chemical citations often do not give the title of the article or full range of pages, so you will need to fill in a topic: use parentheses: (About name of molecule) and starting page number with a + after it.

Interlibrary loan of books can take 10 business days and articles may take 5 business days, so give yourself time to get these materials.

Future Studies/Experimental

In addition to the information found in the articles you look at, Google Patent Search and PubMed can be good places to look for information.

PubMed

PubMed indexes many ACS journals as well, and searching for your reaction in quotes "Hunsdiecker reaction" will pull up some of the most current articles published on the topic.

Google Advanced Search for Patents

Use Google Advanced Search for Patents to search for a named reaction of interest to see how it has been used in a patented chemical process (aka significance.) You can also search by patent number. Program will search patents from 1776 to recent months. Patent image available without loading special software.

name_reaction4.PNG

Molecule (or Reaction Product) Information: Spectra

First Step: SciFinder

Scifinder often has the information you need, complete with citations to the articles that are most helpful. Click on Substance Identifier in the left hand menu and try searching by CAS number, name, or formula.

Struggling to find the article cited in SciFinder? Check the ILL information on the Finding Articles Page.

If you what you want is not in SciFinder, try the following:

Aldrich Library of FT-IR Spectra . 3 v. Reference QD 96 .I5 P66 1989

Aldrich Library of 13C and 1H FT NMR Spectra. 3 v. Reference QC462.85 .A44 1993

Analytical Profiles of Drug Substances series, v. 1-29, except 15. Reference RS189 .A582
This series is for drugs only. It will provide all of the info for your molecule. Full mechanism of drug synthesis. Cumulative index in volume 29.

Dictionary of Organic CompoundsReference QD246 .D5 1996. 6th ed. 9 vols.
Physical data, bibliography listing sources for synthesis, derivatives, and full reviews of the molecule. See page xvi of volume 1 for abbreviations, etc.

Spectral Database for Organic Compounds SDBS This free website, organized by the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan, contains spectral data for many compounds.

Other Sources by Name of Reaction Product (Safety, Significance)

Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology Editions: 3rd, 4th, and 5th.
Different content in each edition. Use the index to each edition to check for examples of your reaction product. Reference TP 9 .E685

Chemical Compounds. Online.
Description of chemical compounds and their common uses, production, and potential hazards. Historical background and useful bibliographies.

Contemporary Drug Synthesis Reference RS403 .C667 2004 For those researching a pharmaceutical, a bit of history and synthesis, with references. On reserve for class.

100 Most Important Chemical Compounds: a Reference Guide. Reference TP 9 .M94 2007 or online
Provides information about the structure, physical properties, importance, and production of compounds.

PubChem will provide images of the structure, utility, and other important info.

Pet Molecule project Extensive guide to how to research a specific molecule compiled by our former science librarian.

Google Scholar . Use the Advanced Search feature to search for articles and patents related to your molecule (example: "benzoic acid" synthesis) Look to the right to see if the article is available in PDF or HTML text format. If not, make notes for Interlibrary Loan!

Citing Sources

The Library's Citing Sources Guide for APA Style provides info with links to helpful websites and a citation formatting program.

You can also use Noodlebib if you need help formatting sources.

Purdue's Online Writing Lab site includes a sample paper, complete with total APA format.

Finally, the APA style blog has some wonderful (and unusual) examples of APA style.

Tags: 

Paraphrasing or Patchwriting?

Confused about when you would need to cite, or where the line is drawn between paraphrasing and patchwriting?

Take a moment to look at the following sources to see definitions and good and bad examples of student writing.

Learn How To Cite

Find directions about how to cite your sources on the library citation guide.

You can also always check out the Purdue OWL website, which has MLA and APA citation guides.

Finally, you are welcome to use NoodleBib if you'd like to use a program to create and organize your citations. You must "Create a New Folder" when you use NoodleBIB for the first time. Click on "I am citing a(n):," choose the type of item you are citing, and then fill in the online form. Your bibliography will be formatted for you.

Further questions? Contact me using the information at the right of the screen.
Tags: 

Chemistry AV

beakers_0.jpg


Molecular Models on Reserve

FIESER MOLECULAR MODEL RESEARCH KIT: - #Z10.400-0
5 copies on reserve for Chemistry students for two-hour use. Check-out from Circulation Desk.
FORMAT = Model. LOCATION = Circulation Desk Reserves.

FISHER MOLECULAR MODEL KIT (BALL AND STICK)
2 copies on reserve for Chemistry students for two-hour use. Check-out from Circulation Desk.
FORMAT = Model. LOCATION = Circulation Desk Reserves.

MOLECULAR VISIONS; THE FLEXIBLE MOLECULAR MODEL KIT
FORMAT = Model. LOCATION = Circulation Desk Reserves.

SARGENT-WELCH MOLECULAR MODEL (BALL AND STICK)
2 copies on reserve for Chemistry students for two-hour use. Check-out from Circulation Desk.
FORMAT = Model. LOCATION = Circulation Desk Reserves.

Measurement

THE FILMS OF CHARLES AND RAY EAMES: POWERS OF TEN c2000.
46 min. Powers of ten was originally produced as a motion picture in 1977. Powers of ten illustrates a picnic in Chicago and then begins moving ten times farther out every ten seconds, until our own galaxy is visible only as a speck of light. Then, we move inward into the hand of a sleeping picnicker with ten times more magnification every ten seconds.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General QA 161 .E95 F556 2000

THE METRIC SYSTEM released between 1992 and 1994.
19 min. Presents basic units of metric measurement. Explains meter, liter, gram, and the use of prefixes to indicate larger and smaller quantities of these units.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 93 .M45 1992.

Laboratory Safety

PRACTICING SAFE SCIENCE 1992.
29 min. Addresses chemical, physical, radiological, and biological hazards in the molecular biology laboratory through reenactments of actual laboratory accidents and demonstrations of good safety techniques. A significant message is the importance of good work habits and consideration for others.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General QD 51 .P73 1992.

SAFETY IN THE RESEARCH LABORATORY 1997.
1 hr., 42 min. Offers guidance on controlling the hazards associated with common activities carried out in the modern biology laboratory. Gives instructions in safe techniques that can help researchers protect themselves from these hazards. Assessing risks of toxic chemicals (11:00) -- Centrifugation hazards (8:50) -- Chemical hazards (9:25) -- Chemical storage hazards (11:14) -- Emergency response (11:40) -- Glassware washing hazards (10:00) -- Mammalian cell culture hazards (8:20) -- Radionuclide hazards (12:24) -- X-ray diffraction hazards (9:27).
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General QD 51 .S243 1997.

SAFETY FIRST IN CAMPUS LABS 1990.
20 min. Uses a series of accident reenactments to help students learn to take responsibility for their actions, become aware of potential safety problems, and be ready to deal with accidents and emergencies.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 51 .S3 1990.

SAFETY IN THE SCIENCE LABORATORY 1990?
30 min. Provides an overview on handling chemicals and equipment safely, as well as proper lab behavior and safety techniques.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 63.5 .S3 1990.

STARTING WITH SAFETY 1991 and 2005.
35 min. ACS video courses. Provides an overview on handling chemicals and equipment safely, proper lab behavior, and safety techniques.
FORMAT = VHS and DVD. LOCATION = VHS (3 copies) : Circulation Desk QD 63.5 .S83 1991. DVD (3 copies) : QD 63.5 .S83 2005.

COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS 1999, c1994.
12 min. Safety meeting kit video series. Describes how compressed gas cylinders work and how to handle and store them safely, including the use of hazard labels and personal protective equipment.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TP 243 .C667 1999.

History of Chemistry

A BRIEF HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY 2003.
18 min. Examines the history of chemistry from its origins in ancient societies, its revolutionary progress in the Pneumatic Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries and its flowering in the 20th century.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 11 .B75 2003.

CHEMISTRY, STOP FORWARD MOVEMENT? [1995], c1994.
57 min. Originally broadcast as a segment of: The Nobel legacy. In five vignettes Dudley Herschbach and Anne Carson highlight important developments in chemistry that impact our lives today. Stop forward movement -- We didn't invent chemistry, nature did -- A touchy mixture -- Before Bob, after Bob -- The genie's not the problem.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 11 .C435 1995.

THE HIDDEN STRUCTURE [1988?], c1974.
52 min. Broadcast as a segment of: Ascent of man. Traces chemistry from its beginning in Oriental metallurgy and alchemy to Dalton's atomic theory and man's knowledge of the elements.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 11 .H5 1988.

MADAME CURIE FINDS RADIUM AND RADIOACTIVITY 1994.
20 min. Presents a video field trip to Paris to visit the office and laboratory of Marie Curie to help explain how Marie Curie found radium and radioactivity.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 22 .C8 M34 1994.

FORGOTTEN GENIUS 2007.
112 min. Originally broadcast as a special episode of the television series Nova on February 6, 2007. Story of Percy Julian's scientific breakthroughs and a biography of his life with period reenactments based on newly opened family archives and interviews with dozens of colleagues and relatives.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General QD 22 .J85 F674 2007.

DIMITRI MENDELEYEV : FATHER OF THE PERIODIC TABLE 1993.
29 min. The story of Dimitri Mendeleyev and his contributions to science, especially his work on the periodic table of elements. The video reveals an intelligent and intuitive scientist who took a strong interest in finding practical uses for the conclusions of abstract science. Thought processes which led to his understanding of the relationships between families of elements and his prediction of the existence of other elements are explained.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 22 .M43 D56 1991.

LINUS PAULING, CRUSADING SCIENTIST 1977.
58 min. Broadcast over PBS as a segment of: NOVA. Explores Linus Pauling's life story and achievements, his profound morality and his genuine devotion to family and friends.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 22 .P37 L5 1977x.

Elements and Periodic Table

ELEMENTS DISCOVERED [1980], c1978.
25 min. Science series. Illustrates how the discovery of the elements depended on the technology available to the scientists who first isolated and analyzed them. Shows reduction processes and alloy formation, analysis of gases, electrolysis, spectroscopy, crystallization and nuclear reactions.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 466 .E5 1980.

OF METALS AND MEN [1982], c1979.
25 min. Inorganic chemistry. S247, Concepts & case studies. Develops and evaluates an inorganic chemistry classification system based on such characteristics of metals as compound forming tendencies, difficulty of extraction, and ability to be oxidized.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 466 .O4 1982.

ELEMENTS ORGANIZED: THE PERIODIC TABLE 1978.
24 min. Science series. Introduces the periodic table by looking at some of the properties of a range of elements. Shows the relative chemical reactivities of the alkali metals with oxygen and of the halogens with phosphorus, and relates these properties to their positions in the periodic table.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 467 .E5 1978.

PERIODIC TRENDS [1999] ,c1994.
20 min. CAPseries. Visualizing the chemical world with animated 3-D models and computer-calculated accuracy. Atomic radii, ionization energies, electron affinities,and electronegativity are key quantities in chemistry. These quantities, and their trends through the periodic table, provide a basis for understanding the chemical properties of the elements. For use in high school and introductory college chemistry classrooms.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk and General QD 467 .P4 1999.

PERIODIC TABLE 1997.
21 min. A segment from the 1985 BBC Worldwide television program: Science topics. The evolution of the periodic table over the past two centuries is illustrated through computer animation and song.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 467 .P465 1997.

THE PERIODIC TABLE FOR STUDENTS 2004.
5 videodiscs (23 min. each) NOTE [v. 1.] Atomic structure & the Periodic Table -- [v. 2.] The history of the Periodic Table -- [v. 3.] Properties of compounds -- [v. 4.] Properties of elements -- [v. 5.] Using the Periodic Table. "Examines the relationship between atomic structure and the properties of matter. Each title includes a closer look at some of the many patterns found in periods and groups of elements that combine to create the world around us"--Container.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 467 .P475 2004.

ALUMINUM 1986.
20 min. Chemistry in action. Shows the process of producing aluminum from bauxite ore and discusses the uses of the product and its alloys.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TP 245.A4 A5 1986x.

General Chemistry

AVOGADRO'S HYPOTHESIS1992.
10 min. The Mole Concept ; 4. Examines Avogadro's hypothesis and the assertion that each particle of gas contains no fewer than two atoms.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 161 .A8 1992.

COMBINING GAS VOLUMES 1992.
10 min. The Mole Concept ; 3. Explains how a single-atom particle should behave and compares the results to Gay-Lussac's observations and law of combining gas volumes.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 161 .C6 1992.

GAS VOLUMES 1992.
10 min. The Mole Concept ; 2. Explains gas volume as a possible container for measuring the mass of atoms.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 161 .G3 1992.

THE MOLE 1992.
10 min. The Mole Concept ; 6. Introduces the mole, its use to standardize gas volume comparisons, and Avogadro's number.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 161 .M6 1992.

THE ATOM 2003. 42 min. Part one traces the history of the atom from ancient Greek times to the present day. Part two presents an outline picture of late twentieth-century concepts of the atom. pt. 1. How we know about atoms (22 min.) -- pt. 2. What is an atom? (20 min.).
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 171 .A86 2003.

ATOMIC THEORY AND CHEMISTRY 1985.
20 min. Observes the invisible world of atoms and molecules in order to understand, and thus predict, the behavior of matter in the visible world.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 173 .A85 1985x.

RELATIVE MASS 1992.
10 min. The Mole Concept ; 1. Explains how to compare the masses of atoms in order to understand differences and calculate the relative masses.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 173 .R4 1992.

RELATIVE ATOMIC MASS 1992.
10 min. The Mole Concept ; 5. Introduces the mass spectrometer, the modern method of measuring atomic mass.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QC 454.M3 R4 1992.

THE SUPER-CHARGED WORLD OF CHEMISTRY c1996.
3 videocassettes (4 hr., 40 min.) Standard Deviants video course review. The Standard Deviants take on the complex world of chemistry. Pt. 1 shows the eternal struggle between superheroes and villains while reviewing difficult concepts such as percent composition and stoichiometry. Pt. 2 reviews thermochemistry, atomic structure, and chemical bonding. Pt. 3 reviews VSEPR theory, Kinetic molecular theory and Dalton's law of partial pressures.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 31.2 .S8 1996.

THE WORLD OF CHEMISTRY [1990], c1988.
26 videocassettes (ca. 30 min. each) Originally broadcast on PBS. The foundations of chemical structures and their behavior are explored through computer animation, demonstrations, and on-site footage at working industrial and research labs. Distinguished scientists discuss yesterday's breakthroughs and today's challenges.
1. Chemistry -- 2. Color -- 3. Measurement, foundation of chemistry -- 4. Modeling the unseen -- 5. A matter of state -- 6. The atom -- 7. The periodic table -- 8. Chemical bonds -- 9. Molecular architecture -- 10. Signals from within -- 11. The mole -- 12. Water -- 13. The driving forces -- 14. Molecules in action -- 15. The busy electron -- 16. The proton in chemistry -- 17. The precious envelope -- 18. The chemistry of the earth -- 19. Metals -- 20. On the surface -- 21. Carbon -- 22. The age of polymers -- 23. Proteins, structure and function -- 24. The genetic code -- 25. Chemistry and the environment -- 26. Futures.
FORMAT = DVD and Streaming video. LOCATIONS = Circulation Desk, General QD 31.2 .W65 1990.

CAULDRON EARTH 2006.
29 min. Molecular universe. This program shows how research into the chemical makeup of geological and biological materials drives the innovation of energy systems, building methods, and transportation technology--and how these improvements can save lives and reduce stress on the environment. Hydrogen fuel cells, resin coatings for giant wind turbines, wax-plaster mixtures for energy-efficient home--the video features these and many other advances, suggesting a future in which humanity can both profit from and protect the Earth.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION Circulation Desk QD 37 .C385 2006.

CHEMISTRY AND LIFE 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. Outlining Earth's early development and the creation of the first organic substances, this program focuses on what humanity has accomplished and what challenges the future holds, in the field of chemistry. Resins, fibers, and plastics that have revolutionized human activity are showcased, especially in the world of sports, with its radically engineered lightweight equipment, and the stunning example of NASA's solar-powered Helios aircraft.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 37 .C446 2006.

THE FUTURE OF CHEMISTRY 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. Demonstrates the importance of chemistry and nanotechnology and their applications in medicine, sports, and the arts. Viewers are introduced to a wide variety of developments, including SAM polymers, textile fibers with built-in antimicrobial functions; SPS ship construction, which creates a highly durable elastic hull layer; and OLED technology, which will lead to TV screens so flexible they can be rolled into a tube. Emphasizes the importance of "green" genetic engineering and the need for chemists to exercise global awareness.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 37 .F888 2006.

NATURE'S CHEMISTRY 2006.
29 min. Molecular universe. This program shows how naturally occurring chemical compounds inspire scientists to push the boundaries of communication and production technology. Entering the insect world, the video explains how bees, butterflies, and other creatures have developed sophisticated methods of communicating and detecting sensory information, and how alternative versions of these systems have been created in laboratories. The chemical makeup of printer's ink and tire rubber--as well as the manufacturing of computer chips--are also shown to be heavily influenced by our understanding of natural substances.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 37 .N388 2006.

LECTURE DEMONSTRATIONS TO ACCOMPANY EBBING, GENERAL CHEMISTRY, SECOND EDITION 1987.
1 videocassette (VHS) Includes 30 demonstrations of various chemistry experiments to be used with General Chemistry / Darrell D. Ebbing -- 2nd ed. -- c1987.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 43 .L4 1987x.

A RESTORATION DRAMA 1992.
30 min. Periodic table and the human element. The stone structure of St. Servatius Basilica in Maastricht, one of Holland's oldest churches, had been crumbling due to a build up of salts, especially calcium sulfate, which expands in its hydrate form. To restore the church, the calcium sulfate had to be removed, but calcium sulfate is not very soluble and therefore difficult to remove. The program shows the steps necessary to solve the problem.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 181.S1 R47 1992.

THE AMAZING MOLE 2003.
27 min. Introduces students to the mole, explaining in a step-by-step way the scale of atomic particles, Avogadro's number, moles in reactions, molar mass, and mole formulas. The program is conveniently divided into chapters to facilitate stopping for reviews and exercises.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 461 .A63 2003.

ATOMIC ORBITALS : VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
11 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Introduction to the periodic table ; Bohr or "shell" model of atomic structure. The sizes and shapes of atomic orbitals play a dominant role in properties of chemical bonding. Key concepts include the organization of the periodic table, the shapes of atomic orbitals, and orbital features important for chemical bonding.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk and General QD 461 .A8 1995.

CHEMICAL BONDING : BONDING BETWEEN MOLECULES [1998], c1997.
19 min. Explains bonding in terms of dipole-dipole bonding for polar molecules, and dispersion forces for both polar and nonpolar molecules.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 461 .C446 1998.

CHEMICAL BONDING : BONDING IN METALS [1998], c1997.
22 min. Discusses the idea that bonding is related to the filling of electron shells to create more stable particles. Examples of metals and their usefulness are presented, and the relationship between properties and structure is examined.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 461 .C4462 1998.

CHEMICAL BONDING : INNER FORCES c1999.
1 computer optical disc. Multimedia CD-ROM consisting of seven modules that investigate the different types of chemical bonding and test student comprehension using diagrams, video segments, activities, and explanatory material. Additional features include individual log-ins, internet links, and a glossary. Introduction to bonding -- Atomic structure -- Ionic compounds --Molecular compounds --Metallic substances -- Covalent compounds.
FORMAT = Interactive CD. LOCATION = General QD 461 .C39 1999.

THE MOLECULAR THEORY OF MATTER [198-?], c1965.
11 min. Uses animation and stop-motion photography to discuss the basic premise of the kinetic molecular theory that matter consists of molecules in motion. Demonstrates experiments on the diffusion of gases and liquids and shows ways to measure the pressure of a gas.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 461 .M63 1985.

MOLECULAR ORBITALS 1999, [c1994].
16 min. CAPseries. Visualizing the chemical world with animated 3-D models and computer-calculated accuracy. Molecular orbitals describe the fundamental process by which atoms join together to form a chemical bond. This project presents the molecular orbital depiction of homonuclear diatomic molecules, emphasizing the bonding and energies of these basic molecular building blocks. For use in AP high school and introductory college chemistry classrooms.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 461 .M65 1999.

VSEPR : VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
12 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Lewis dot concept of bonding ; Introduction to expanded octets (e.g., PF5) and non-octets (e.g., BeH2). Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion theory remains one of the simplest, most powerful tools for understanding the shapes of molecules. Based only on simple Lewis dot concepts of chemical bonding, VSEPR allows for the prediction of the shapes and bond angles of a wide variety of molecules.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk and General QD 469 .V7 1995.

STEREOCHEMISTRY : VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994. 14 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Lewis dot bonding of carbon centers. The three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in molecules plays a crucial role in chemical reactivity. Enantiomers, chirality, diastereomers, Newman projections, and other important aspects of stereochemistry are graphically illustrated.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 481 .S8 1995.

EQUILIBRIUM : CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS c2003, 2004.
2 videocassettes (45 min.) v. 1. The concepts of equilibrium -- v. 2. Applying the concepts of equilibrium. Uses real-world examples and analogies to offer an in-depth look at both the concepts and applications of equilibrium. Sample problems are provided.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 501 .E69 2004.

NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION : VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
10 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Lewis dot bonding concepts for carbon centers. Nucleophilic substitution provides a classic example of chemical reactions capable of proceeding through multiple pathways. Explores the stereochemical consequences of these different paths, the concept of a transition state, the possibility of a discrete reaction intermediate, and the interpretation of reaction coordinates in the context of basic nucleophilic substitution reactions.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 501 .N8 1995.

THE RATES OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS 1989.
15 min. CHEM study ; v. 21. Illustrates the mechanisms of some simple chemical reactions. Explains the effect of temperature, activation energy, geometry of collision, and catalysis upon the rate of reaction.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 502 .R3 1989.

THE DIELS-ALDER REACTION : VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
12 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Chemistry of carbon centers. The synthesis of complex substances generally involves challenges in controling the stereochemical arrangement of molecules. Features aspects of stereochemically controlled synthesis, as well as orbital control of reaction products.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 503 .D5 1995.

EQUILIBRIUM 1989.
20 min. CHEM study ; v. 11. Deals with three questions: what is chemical equilibrium, how does the chemist recognize it, and how does one explain it. Stresses the dynamic nature of equilibrium and uses radioactive tracers to demonstrate the dynamic behavior of substances at equilibrium in a closed system. Uses an analogy in terms of fish population in two connected bowls, and animation using molecular models, to present the concepts.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 503 .E64 1989.

CATALYSIS 1989.
17 min. CHEM study ; v. 3. Emphasizes that catalysts are typical chemical reactants, unique in that catalysts are regenerated during the reaction.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 505 .C37 1989.

CATALYSIS : TECHNOLOGY FOR A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT 1993.
32 min. Explains what catalysis is and how it works.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 505 .C38 1993.

ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS 1989.
24 min. CHEM study ; v. 9. Describes the construction and operation of an electrochemical cell. Time-lapse photography of the changes at the electrodes and animation of the cell processes show the nature of the electrode reactions, the motion of the electron and ion currents, and the relationship between concentrations and cell voltage. Extreme close-ups of a hydrogen electrode illustrate its operation and lead to a discussion of the table of E values.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 568 .E6 1989.

CRYSTALS : VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
12 min. CAPseries. From gold and diamond to sodium chloride, face-centered cubic crystals characterize many important substances. Illustrates Miller indices, lattice vectors, and crystal surface structures within the framework of the face-centered cubic crystal lattice.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 921 .C79 1995.

MAGIC MATERIALS 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. Laboratory-created substances figure prominently into our lives. Examines synthetic materials research that is leading to breakthroughs in many creative and technical fields. Demonstrating the tremendous influence of silicone and super-strength polymers on a wide range of occupations--including architecture, sculpture, textile production, car design, cosmetics, precious metal mining, and recreation--the video uses high-tech laboratory footage and eye-catching animation to depict unprecedented product development.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TP1088 .M345 2006.

Organic Chemistry/Biochemistry

CAULDRON EARTH 2006.
29 min. Molecular universe. This program shows how research into the chemical makeup of geological and biological materials drives the innovation of energy systems, building methods, and transportation technology--and how these improvements can save lives and reduce stress on the environment. Hydrogen fuel cells, resin coatings for giant wind turbines, wax-plaster mixtures for energy-efficient home--the video features these and many other advances, suggesting a future in which humanity can both profit from and protect the Earth.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION Circulation Desk QD 37 .C385 2006.

CHEMISTRY AND LIFE 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. Outlining Earth's early development and the creation of the first organic substances, this program focuses on what humanity has accomplished and what challenges the future holds, in the field of chemistry. Resins, fibers, and plastics that have revolutionized human activity are showcased, especially in the world of sports, with its radically engineered lightweight equipment, and the stunning example of NASA's solar-powered Helios aircraft.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 37 .C446 2006.

THE FUTURE OF CHEMISTRY 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. Demonstrates the importance of chemistry and nanotechnology and their applications in medicine, sports, and the arts. Viewers are introduced to a wide variety of developments, including SAM polymers, textile fibers with built-in antimicrobial functions; SPS ship construction, which creates a highly durable elastic hull layer; and OLED technology, which will lead to TV screens so flexible they can be rolled into a tube. Emphasizes the importance of "green" genetic engineering and the need for chemists to exercise global awareness.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 37 .F888 2006.

NATURE'S CHEMISTRY 2006.
29 min. Molecular universe. This program shows how naturally occurring chemical compounds inspire scientists to push the boundaries of communication and production technology. Entering the insect world, the video explains how bees, butterflies, and other creatures have developed sophisticated methods of communicating and detecting sensory information, and how alternative versions of these systems have been created in laboratories. The chemical makeup of printer's ink and tire rubber--as well as the manufacturing of computer chips--are also shown to be heavily influenced by our understanding of natural substances.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 37 .N388 2006.

CARBON THE COMPROMISER 1992.
10 min. Organic chemistry 1. Carbon connection. Presents a chronicle of early breakthroughs in chemistry including the discovery of a method to produce organic compounds and the discovery of covalent bonds, the cornerstone of organic chemistry. Covalent bonds are defined and two-dimensional computer animation shows how they are formed.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 251.2 .C3 1992.

CARBON BONDING 1992.
10 min. Organic chemistry 1. Carbon connection. Examines the nature of carbon bonds including sigma bonds, which are relatively stable, and pi bonds, which are slightly weaker. Computer animation illustrates the complex structure of double bonds and shows how double bonds are formed by carbon action.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 251.2 .C37 1992.

THE DEEP-FRIED WORLD OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PART 1 1997.
140 min. The Standard Deviants video course review. Presents a review of basic chemistry and organic chemistry concepts including hybridization states of carbon, naming alkanes, alkane structures, and cycloalkane structures. 1997 Telly Award for Best Educational Video.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 251.2 .D4 1997 pt.1.

THE DEEP-FRIED WORLD OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. PART 2 1997.
106 min. The Standard Deviants video course review. Presents organic chemistry concepts including organic reactions, alkenes, electrophilic addition reactions, Markovnikov's Rule, and Hammond Postulate.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 251.2 .D4 1997 pt.2.

THE DEEP-FRIED WORLD OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. PART 3 1997.
120 min. The Standard Deviants video course review. Presents organic chemistry concepts including electrophilic addition reactions, alkynes, and alkyne addition reactions. FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 251.2 .D4 1997 pt.3.

FIXING FUELS 1992.
10 min. Organic chemistry 1. Carbon connection. Discusses common fossil fuels. Introduces structural isomers by examining the makeup of butane. Demonstrates the process of removing impurities from natural gas and the process of fractional distillation of petroleum.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QD 251.2 .F5 1992.

HARVEST OF ENZYMES 1992.
10 min. Organic chemistry 1. Carbon connection. Investigates the relationship between the structure and function of enzymes in the human body to show why the enzyme is so attractive to industry. Discusses commercial applications of two large classes of enzymes.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD251.2 .H3 1992.

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN ACTION 1998.
28 min.Demystifies the structure of organic compounds by providing a simple, logical investigation of the significance of structure and its relationship to the behavior of organic compounds.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 251.2 .O74 1998.

THE SHAPE OF CARBON 1992.
10 min. Organic chemistry 1. Carbon connection. Explains the planetary and quantum models of the atom. Computer animation illustrates the concept of bonding orbitals and the stability of some carbon compounds.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 251.2 .S4 1992.

POLYETHYLENE 1992.
10 min. Organic chemistry 1. Carbon connection. Explores the history of the development of polyethylene and its numerous applications, beginning with a daring experiment conducted in Britain in the 1930's. Demonstrates the molecular process of converting ethylene, one of the simplest monomers, into polyethylene.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 281 .P3 P6 1992.

BASIC CHEMISTRY FOR BIOLOGY STUDENTS 1993.
21 min. Introduces biology students to the basic chemistry of life, including atoms, elements, molecules, ions, isotopes, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 415 .B3 1993.

STEREOCHEMISTRY: VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
14 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Lewis dot bonding of carbon centers. The three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in molecules plays a crucial role in chemical reactivity. Enantiomers, chirality, diastereomers, Newman projections, and other important aspects of stereochemistry are graphically illustrated.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 481 .S8 1995.

NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION: VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994. 10 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Lewis dot bonding concepts for carbon centers. Nucleophilic substitution provides a classic example of chemical reactions capable of proceeding through multiple pathways. Explores the stereochemical consequences of these different paths, the concept of a transition state, the possibility of a discrete reaction intermediate, and the interpretation of reaction coordinates in the context of basic nucleophilic substitution reactions.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 501 .N8 1995.

THE DIELS-ALDER REACTION: VISUALIZING THE CHEMICAL WORLD [1995], c1994.
12 min. CAPseries. Prerequisites: Chemistry of carbon centers. The synthesis of complex substances generally involves challenges in controling the stereochemical arrangement of molecules. Features aspects of stereochemically controlled synthesis, as well as orbital control of reaction products.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QD 503 .D5 1995.

MEDICINE AND MOLECULES 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. This program guides students through advances to biotechnology and genetic engineering that may lead to long-sought medical treatments and cures. Presenting the 19th-century development of aspirin as the first synthetic imitation of a naturally derived medicinal substance, the video demonstrates large-scale present-day experiments on fungi and plant material that make gene-based medical breakthroughs almost inevitable. The creation of smart plastics for surgical applications will further expand students' understanding of where medicine and nanotechnology meet.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QH 506 .M445 2006.

FOOD PACKAGING 2004.
31 min. "Using a clever news report approach, this program addresses three important topics: packaging materials and their function, safety, and design; innovations in packaging techniques; and environmental issues involving packaging, with an emphasis on plastics. Experts from Heinz and Cryovac, among others, discuss packaging development while making sense of key industry terms such as modified atmosphere and active and aseptic packaging"--Container.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TP 374 .F66 2004.

MAGIC MATERIALS 2006.
30 min. Molecular universe. Laboratory-created substances figure prominently into our lives. Examines synthetic materials research that is leading to breakthroughs in many creative and technical fields. Demonstrating the tremendous influence of silicone and super-strength polymers on a wide range of occupations--including architecture, sculpture, textile production, car design, cosmetics, precious metal mining, and recreation--the video uses high-tech laboratory footage and eye-catching animation to depict unprecedented product development.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TP1088 .M345 2006.

PLASTICS 1992.
16 min. Explains the processes used in the synthesis of plastics, describes how their physical properties are related to their chemical structure, and suggests solutions for the problem of plastic wastes.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TP 1120 .P5 1992.

UNDERSTANDING PLASTICS 1987.
30 min. Examines the basic process used to convert plastic molding materials into finished products. Considers the history and growth of the plastics industry, problems related to the disposal of discarded plastic products, and some of the advantages of using plastics in the manufacture of many consumer products.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TP 1120 .U6 1987x.

POLYETHENE 1986.
21 min. Chemistry in action. Tells how polyethene/polyethylene is derived from crude oil, processed, andused to make commercial plastic products. Discusses some advantages and disadvantages of replacing wood and glass with plastic products.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TP 1180 .P65 P6 1986x.

Chemistry and the Environment/Green Chemistry

DANGER AT THE BEACH 1991.
58 min. Originally broadcast as a National Audubon Society special. An examination of the growing dangers of toxic waste and ocean degradation along U.S. coastal waters.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General GC 1085 .D36 1991.

THE HABITABLE PLANET: A SYSTEMS APPROACH TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 2007.
4 videodiscs (390 min.) Explores the natural functions of Earth's systems: geophysical, atmospheric, oceanic, and ecosystems; Earth's ability to sustain life, especially human life; and the effects that human actions have had on the different natural systems. Contents Disc 1. program 1, Many planets, one earth. program 2, Atmosphere. program 3, Oceans. program 4, Ecosystems -- Disc 2. program 5, Human population dynamics. program 6, Risk, exposure, and health. program 7, Agriculture. program 8, Water resources -- Disc 3. program 9, Biodiversity decline. program 10, Energy challenges. program 11, Atmospheric pollution -- Disc 4. program 12, Earth's changing climate. program 13, Looking forward : our global experiment.
FORMAT = DVD and Streaming video. LOCATION = Circulation Desk GE 105 .H335 2007.

WE ALL LIVE DOWNSTREAM 1990.
29 min. The Beluga, a Greenpeace research vessel, took a journey down the Mississippi River "to find out if America's clean water laws are working." Includes interviews with residents of several communities along the river; also, takes a look at several companies alleged to have dumped hazardous wastes.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATIONS = Circulation Desk and General GE 155 .M57 W4 1990.

INTRODUCTION TO GREEN CHEMISTRY: INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES FOR INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY 2002.
Book and CD-ROM. Accompanying CD-ROM contains PDF version of book and PowerPoint slide presentation "Green chemistry: preventing pollution, sustaining the earth.
FORMAT = Book and CD-ROM. LOCATION = General QD 31.3 .I687 2002.

RESTORING ALASKA: TEN YEARS IN THE WAKE OF EXXON VALDEZ 1999.
57 min. This award-winning PBS television special looks at the ten year restoration process following the worst oil spill in U.S. history. It explores the legacy of this tragedy and its lingering effects on wildlife and people in the region, as well as efforts to see that it never happens again.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QH 545.O5 R4 1999.

RACHEL CARSON'S SILENT SPRING 1993.
57 min. Originally broadcast on PBS as a segment of: The American experience. Focuses on Rachel Carson's book Silent spring and the chemical poisoning of the environment. Examines how one scientist's courage changed the way we think about our world.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General QH 545 .P4 R3 1993.

GREAT LAKES, BITTER LEGACY 1992.
58 min. Originally broadcast as a National Audubon Society special. Focuses on the effect of toxic chemicals buried beneath the mud of the Great Lakes.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk QH 545 .W3 G73 1992.

CAN BUILDINGS MAKE YOU SICK? 1995.
56 min. Originally broadcast on PBS as an episode of: Nova. Examines sick building syndrome, a condition in which people suffer from sicknesses caused by absorbing toxic fumes or other pollutants found in some modern airtight buildings.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General RA 577.5 .C3 1995.

MAY 19, 1980, THE POISONED DREAM [1999], c1997.
51 min. Turning points of history. Three frustrated mothers made American history by taking federal officials hostage in the community built on the site of New York's toxic Love Canal. These three activists, Lois Gibbs, Barbara Quimby and Patti Grenzy, and research scientist Dr. Beverly Paigen, discuss their four-year political battle to have their community evacuated.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TD 181 .N72 M39 1999.

IN THE NAME OF PROGRESS. PROGRAM 4. RACE TO SAVE THE PLANET SERIES 1990.
60 min. Are environmental protection and economic development inherently in conflict? Takes viewers to Brazil and India to see how some environmental disasters began as well-intentioned development projects and to learn how development could proceed while protecting the environment.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION' = Circulation Desk TD 185.5 .B6 I6 1990x.

DO YOU REALLY WANT TO LIVE THIS WAY? PROGRAM 3. RACE TO SAVE THE PLANET SERIES 1989.
60 min. Tells how freeways, shopping malls, and industrial and technological wealth have been the rewards of modern society. Examines the price of progress, including smog, toxic wastes, and contamination of once- pristine waters, all by-products of Western industrial life-styles.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATIONS = Circulation Desk TD 194 .D6 1989.

ACID RAIN, NEW BAD NEWS , c1984.
58 min. Originally broadcast on PBS as a segment of Nova. Traveling through West Germany, the mid-Atlantic and New England, this program looks at the controversy surrounding acid rain.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TD 196 .A25 A32 1984x.

ACID RAIN: REQUIEM OR RECOVERY c1982.
27 min. Uses graphics and maps to show the dangers of precipitation containing excesses of nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxide and to depict where these emissions originate and fall. Documents Canadian and American studies on acid rain's dire effects on wildlife, plants, and buildings and other structures. Observes experiments being performed to determine the exact amount of destruction caused by acid rain and the metals leached into the soil by it.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TD 196 .A25 A33 1982x.

ACID RAINBOWS c1989.
28 min. Discusses the effects of acid rain on the American west. Includes information from remote wilderness sites and new data from western cities.
FORMAT= VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TD 196 .A25 A34 1989.

POISONED WATERS c2009.
120 min. Originally aired on Apr. 21, 2009 as an episode of the PBS television series Frontline. Examines the rising hazards of water pollution to human health and the ecosystem and why it's so hard to keep our waters clean. Shows the great coastal estuaries of Puget Sound and the Chesapeake Bay and how they are in perilous condition. With polluted runoff still flowing in from industry, agriculture and massive suburban development, scientists fear contamination to the food chain and drinking water for millions of people. A growing list of endangered species also is threatened in both estuaries. Introduction -- Imperiled Chesapeake Bay -- Once we cared-- One of the biggest pollution sources? -- Regulating the poultry industry -- The startling new contaminants -- What we don't know -- Puget sound, hot spot for PCB's -- Seattle's Duwamish River -- A lesson from South Park -- #1 menace to waterways -- Save the forest, save the waters -- D.C.'s development sprawl -- Arlington, Va. : a showcase for smart growth.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TD 420 .P657 2009.

RACE TO SAVE THE PLANET. WASTE NOT, WANT NOT 1989.
60 min. Recounts stories about garbage barges, toxic dumping, overflowing landfills, and sewage polluting coastal waters. Explodes some myths and tells some surprising stories about water pollution
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TD 420 .W3 1989x.

INDOOR AIR REPORT: BREATHE EASY 1994.
15 min. Discusses the 3 major categories of indoor air quality problems: sick building syndrome, building related illnesses, and environmental tobacco smoke and identifies solutions, including removing the contaminants and proper ventilation control.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TD 883.17 .I564 1994.

MANAGING INDOOR AIR QUALITY 1996.
42 min. Covers indoor air quality problems and what can be done to solve them.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TD 883.17 .M36 1996.

TOXIC WASTES c1994.
39 min. Keys to scientific literacy. Gives a historical and ecological perspective on the vexing toxic waste dilemma. Includes contemporary and archival photographs, art prints, and graphic examples. pt. 1. A history of toxic wastes (17 min.) -- pt. 2. Toxic wastes, today and tomorrow (22 min.).
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TD 1030 .T6 1994.

THE ETHANOL SOLUTION c2006.
13 min. Originally broadcast on May 7, 2006 as a segment of : 60 minutes. Can the fuel distilled from corn and other renewable materials one day replace the billions of barrels of oil the U.S. imports each year? Brazil has managed to do this and Dan Rather talks to scientists, farmers and others who think, eventually, the U.S. can too.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TJ 808 .E85 2006.

LIFE AFTER OIL; THE NEW ENERGY ALTERNATIVES 2007. 30 min. Illustrates ways we can solve our dependence on fossil fuels through the use of alternative energy sources including wind power, fuel cells, hydrogen fuel, ethanol, biomass and solar power.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TJ 808 .L544 2007.

RENEWABLE ENERGY c2006.
45 min. Originally broadcast as a segment of: Modern marvels. Explores the recent advances and technologies of renewable energy, in particular solar, wind, geothermal, biofuels, and tidal power.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TJ 808 .R463 2006.

RENEWABLE ENERGY c2007.
28 min. Originally produced in 2005 as an episode of: Ethical makets. This program examines the urgent need--not only in the U.S. but across the world--for sustainable energy. It also illustrates how new power production methods are becoming a reality. Alternative energy trendsetters are featured, including Time magazine "Hero for the Planet" Geoffrey Ballard, who explains his hydrogen fuel cell innovations. Evergreen Solar vice president Mark Farber describes his company's advanced solar cell production methods and its mission to provide access to energy in the developing world--a goal shared by the Solar Electric Light Fund, says executive director Bob Freling. In addition, Rocky Mountain Institute founder Amory Lovins promotes the benefits of small solar power plants, and economist Hazel Henderson explores the potential of wind energy.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TJ 808 .R464 2007.

LITTLE BLACK BOX 2003.
22 min. Originally broadcast August 25, 2003 as a segment of Nightline. Robert Krulwich and the guys from Car Talk on NPR explain how hydrogen fuel cell technology works. While hydrogen cars may be a solution to cutting pollution and dealing with the high price of gasoline, is the general public willing to pay more for their vehicles for some of these benefits?
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TL 229 .H9 L588 2003.

A CRUDE AWAKENING: THE OIL CRASH c2007.
83 min. Examines the conventional wisdom that oil production will continue to climb, and instead stare[s] bleakly at a planet facing economic meltdown and conflict over its most valuable resource. Precious and non-renewable -- We use it for everything! -- From boom to bust -- A magnet for war -- The numbers don't add up -- Peaking out -- An insatiable demand -- The end of the American Dream -- Technology to the rescue? -- Life after the peak.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TN 870 .C783 2007.

THE FUTURE OF ENERGY GASES [1994].
29:30 min. Using historical and contemporary film and video images, narrative explanations of scientific concepts, and animation, explains the origin and occurrence of oil and natural gas, the environmental benefits and consequences of burning natural gas, and economic implications of its use.
FORMAT= VHS. LOCATION = General TN 881.A1 F8 1994.

GREEN CHEMISTRY: INNOVATIONS FOR A CLEANER WORLD 2000.
20 min. Introduction -- Large corporation perspective -- Small business perspective -- University perspective -- Summary.
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = General TP 155.2 .E58 G744 2000.

GREEN CHEMISTRY: MEETING GLOBAL CHALLENGES 2003.
92 min. "These materials were developed through a cooperative effort of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)"--Container. Four presentations from the 2002 Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference. The speakers show how green chemistry can address global challenges such as reducing the use of toxic chemicals, mitigating the risk of climate change, limiting water and resource depletion, and meeting growing demands for energy and food. Contents: Meeting the challenges to sustainability / Paul Anastas (19 min.) -- The protection of water resources / Dennis L. Hjeresen (24 min.) -- Green oxidation chemistry / Terry Collins (20 min.) -- The greening of agriculture production / Roger N. Beachy (29 min.) Special features: "About green chemistry", The Green Chemistry Institute, and presenter interviews.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION TP 155.2 .E58 G74 2003.

BIOFUELS: FUELS FOR THE FUTURE c2007.
22 min. Investigates the mode of production of a range of biofuels, from biogas, ethanol and butanol to vegetable oils and biodiesel. Introduction -- Traditional fuels -- Biofuels -- Butanol, vegetable oil and biodiesel -- Specific uses of biofuel -- Advantagesand disadvantages -- End credits.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TP 359 .B46 B563 2007.

HYDROGEN HOPES c2005.
27 min. Originally presented as an episode of Scientific American frontiers. Alan Alda meets with hydrogen enthusiasts working toward a future when hydrogen can be made in unlimited quantities from renewable, non-polluting resources.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TP 359 .H8 H948 2005.

HYDROGEN: THE SAFE AND CLEAN FUEL 2003.
27 min. "Imagine...a fuel you can make from water...a fuel that eliminates dependence of foreign energy sources...a fuel that can be produced pretty much anywhere, to do just about anything that requires energy. A zero emission fuel that doesn't pollute the air...a fuel that is non-toxic...and safe to use. Sound too good to be true? It's not. It's called hydrogen." -- (video case)
FORMAT = VHS. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TP 359 .H8 H947 2003.

THE HYDROGEN AGE c2005.
57 min. Documentary about how hydrogen can be used as energy in the United States and around the world, which includes systems that are fully operational and those that are in development. It examines the PEM fuel cell equipment and technology and how it provides energy for developing nations while reducing pollution and environmental damage.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = Circulation Desk TP 359 .H8 H9473 2005

BLUE VINYL 2005.
98 min. Skeptical of her parents' decision to re-side their home with vinyl siding (polyvinyl chloride or PVC), Judith Helfand set out with Daniel B. Gold in search of the truth about vinyl.
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TP 1180 .V58 B584 2005.

FOOD ADDITIVES: WHY SO MANY CHEMICALS? 2008.
25 min. Takes a simple, factual look at the everyday trade-offs we make when we choose our food. Describes the chemicals used, why they are added and how we can make intelligent, informed decisions about the food we eat
FORMAT = DVD. LOCATION = General TX 553 .A3 F6643 2008.

Tags: 

Scientific Research Articles

Distinguishing a Research Article From a Popular Article

RedCOM.jpg

Worried that you might be reading a trade article from a scholarly article, or a review article from a scientific research article?

Start by looking for the distinctive markers of a scholarly article: are the authors' degrees or university affiilations listed? Do you see an abstract? How about charts, tables, graphs?

Confused? Take a look at page one of a scholarly article below:

scholarly article marked.png
Notice the following:

  1. The authors list a university affiliation
  2. The abstract is right in the center of the page
  3. The (unmarked) introduction

Once you are certain that you are looking at a scholarly article, make certain that your article is a scientific research (and not review) article by looking for the following distinctive sections:

Abstract

This is a paragraph-long summary of the contents of the article, including the hypothesis and conclusion. This can be a vitally important section which will help you 1. figure out the focus of the article and 2) help you to puzzle through the especially dense language of some articles-- after all, you know where the authors are heading!

Introduction

The introduction introduces the topic, explaining what research has already been done on this topic ( often called a literature review) and what questions the researchers were trying to answer.

Method

The method section describes how the experiment was conducted.

Results

The results list the data collected from the experiment.

Discussion

The discussion section explains the significance of the results: was the hypothesis supported, or were there unanticipated results?

Conclusion

The conclusion restates the results of the experiment and states further areas for research: what questions remain to be answered?

References or Works Cited

This is where the authors note the previously conducted research which helped to shape their own work in this study.

Some of these sections may be merged with other sections, have slightly different names, or may not be labeled, but all should be present in one way or another.

Want to take a closer look? Cladophora (Chlorophyta) spp. Harbor Human Bacterial Pathogens in Nearshore Water of Lake Michigan is a research article found on PubMedCentral, a government-sponsored free database with many free articles available. You can use this as a model scholarly research article.

Having Trouble Reading Your Article?

  • Check out this handy guide to reading scholarly articles.
  • Remember that you can use reference databases to explain words or concepts that you're unfamiliar with. Try searching Credo or Gale to start.

Questions? Contact me or the reference desk and you can verify that a source is a scholarly research article. (Or we can help you find one.)

Chemistry 1105: Garcia

3-D electron orbitals.jpg
Welcome! Click on a tab below to find books, articles, and websites for use in this course.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of the resources below from off campus. If your card is not working, it may need to be reactivated.

Questions? Feel free to use my contact info to the right, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat.

Image Credit: Ivan S. Ufimtsev, Stanford University; Image created using VMD
  1. Topic
  2. Find Books and Articles
  3. Evaluate Websites
  4. Cite sources

Pick a Topic

One of the best ways to get started is to take a look at your textbook. What ideas have caught your attention? What questions do you have from class discussions?

Google News also provides good current news on a variety of topics.

If you have any questions about definitions from your textbook, or the context of some of these issues (such as "how long have we been using nuclear energy in the US?"), head to a reference source to discover more information. Gale Virtual Reference Library and CQ Researcher are both good sources of information.
chemical and engineering news.PNG

Finally, you can browse through current chemistry magazines and journals in order to see current headlines. For example, take a look at

  • Chemical and Engineering News
  • Science News
  • American Scientist

Find Books

Our library catalog contains our books, our DVDs and other physical items. Search by topic, such as "drinking water" and pay attention to the ways to limit your search on the left side of the screen.

Find Articles

Next, head to a database:

Once you have a concrete question, head to a library database in order to find scholarly articles. The best bets for your topic are:

Academic Search Complete: ASC offers a wide variety of topics with a wide variety of types of sources (newspapers, magazines, scholarly articles.) It's a good place to look for anything with a current focus (such as Fukushima Daiichi), but be sure to know what you're looking at.

Science Direct: SD contains only scientific scholarly articles. Be sure to select "Subscribed Journals" while searching, and use Gale as necessary in order to get more information about any topics you may have questions about.

You're also welcome to explore our other science databases for more information.

Evaluating Websites

While you're doing Google searches to either narrow your topic or in order to dig up more information on certain subject, you want to be careful to decide if the information you find is trustworthy.

When it comes to science, nearly everyone has opinions: are we getting enough Vitamin D? What will fracking do for our economy or our groundwater supply? Your job is to evaluate the information you can find through Google to find the good websites--those written by authors you can trust, with good and up-to-date information.

Authorship: Who created this website? What is their background on the topic? Are they trustworthy?

Bias: Why was the website created? What point of view does the author have? Does that limit the facts they present or how the facts are presented?

Date: How old is the information that is presented? Is it still accurate?

Questions? Check out the COD Library's guide to evaluating information.

Remember, you can restrict your search to government websites only in Google by adding site:.gov to your search.

Class Exercise

Take a moment to look at your website. Is this information trustworthy? How do you know? Be prepared to tell your classmates your opinion.

Cite Sources

Find directions about how to cite your sources on the library citation guide.

You can also always check out the Purdue OWL website, which has MLA and APA citation guides.

Finally, you are welcome to use NoodleBib if you'd like to use a program to create and organize your citations. You must "Create a New Folder" when you use NoodleBIB for the first time. Click on "I am citing a(n):," choose the type of item you are citing, and then fill in the online form. Your bibliography will be formatted for you.

Plagiarize, Patchwrite, Paraphrase?

Confused about when you would need to cite, or where the line is drawn between paraphrasing and patchwriting?

Take a moment to look at the following sources to see definitions and good and bad examples of student writing. Further questions? Contact me using the information at the right of the screen.

Tags: 

Chemistry

beakers_0.jpg

Welcome to the Chemistry Research Guide.

Click on a tab below to find books, videos, articles, and websites for use in General Chemistry classes. Organic Chemistry research is covered in the Organic Chemistry Research Guide.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of these resources from off campus.

Questions? Feel free to contact me, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat. Want to know more about the COD library? Check out our orientation video.

  1. Reference & Models
  2. Books & Videos
  3. Articles
  4. Websites

Reference Works

Reference works such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic.

chemical info for chemists.PNG
Looking for a general book that explains how to conduct chemistry research? Check out Chemical Information for Chemists: A Primer. We have two copies, one in reference, and one in general, and the book covers patent searching, physical data, reaction searching, and many other topics of interest for chemistry research.

We also have a catalog of current chemicals and lab equipment sold in reference: Aldrich Handbook of Fine Chemicals. Annual.Reference TP 202 .A38

You can also look through the recommended dictionaries and encyclopedias below:

General Chemistry Encyclopedias:

Chemistry of Common Objects

Properties of Specific Substances

Safety

Models

Check out our chemistry models.

Finding Books& Videos

Use the COD Library catalog to find books & videos. Select the type of resources that you're looking for (books, videos, etc.) and try typing keywords that connect to your topic. You'll need a current College of DuPage Library card to check out books.

chem_gen_cat.PNG

Once you've found a book that interests you, write down the book title, location, and call number (the items circled below) and come to the reference desk for help finding it.

chem_gen_cat2.PNG

Streaming Videos

In addition to many of the DVDs and streaming videos that can be found in the catalog, you can also look through the following streaming platforms for films:

See all of our Online Video resources.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.
Access the article databases listed below.

Searching for Chemistry Articles

  • Academic Search Complete This database has a lot of good chemistry articles, both popular and scholarly.
  • Science Direct Full-text of hundreds of scientific journals from the publisher Elsevier. Be sure to select "Subscribed Journals" from the Source drop-down menu.
  • SciFinder indexes a lot of scholarly chemistry articles. Enter your search terms in the initial search box. Want help with searching Scifinder? Look here.
  • Science Online. The full text of Science from 1997-Present. Science is available from 1880-1996 in the JSTOR database.

Chemistry journals available online fulltext from databases.

Searching for Other Chemistry Information:

  • HAZMAT Zone. Online full text access to MSDS Data Sheets, tutorials working with chemical hazards in the workplace and an MSDS glossary. One user limit at a time. User Name: codlib Password: library
  • Knovel Library This database is a cross-searchable collection of electronic books covering many subjects in technology, engineering, applied technology, science, chemistry and physics and much more.
  • SciFinder also has lots of great info about chemical compounds, etc., Search by name, formula, or structure. Be sure to read the instructions on the page about creating a username and password, and check out the Searching SciFinder guide.

Websites

  • ThoughtCo.Com Chemistry Articles on everyday chemistry and interesting topics in the field, homework help, worked problems with explanations, a chemical structures archive, and more. Both free and for-fee content.
  • ChemCollective Interactive activities to help students learn chemistry via virtual labs, tutorials, scenarios, simulations and concept tests. Organized by organized by a group of faculty and staff at Carnegie Mellon University.
  • Chemical Industry Home Page Links to chemical suppliers and other websites for patent information, careers, journals, etc.
  • Chemistry.org: the Website of the American Chemical Society Although much content is available only to ACS members, open availability of the "molecule of the week" (with archive), News & Research, career resources and many features for students under the Education tab make this a valuable website for chemistry students.
  • ChemSpider 28 million chemical structures covered with information and links to literature, physical properties, spectra, and suppliers. Search by official name, trade name, CAS number and more.
  • Explore Chemical History from the Science History Institute Time lines, faces, and further resources for such areas of chemistry as matter and molecules, polymers, and the chemistry of life.
  • General Chemistry Online Tutorials, exam survival guide, simulations, FAQs, and more from the Department of Chemistry at Frostburg State University. Last maintained in 2010 but still useful.
  • HERO Database from the EPA Link to scientific references and data used by the Environmental Protection Agency to determine environmental risks of chemicals. Primarily citation and abstract, not fulltext. Check Library databases for full article or use Interlibrary Loan.
  • It's Elemental: the Periodic Table Chemical & Engineering News 80th anniversary issue on the building blocks of chemistry. Includes 89 essays on individual and groups of elements.
  • KnowledgeDoor A multitude of data on the elements of the periodic table, including abundances in the human body, the earth, the universe and much more.
  • Martindale's The Calculators and Chemistry Center
    Organized by broad topic, a gateway to chemistry sites on the web for everything from journals to periodic tables to tutorials to safety plus many online calculators.
  • Material Safety Data Sheets and Where to Find them on the Internet
    Provides an up-to-date list of Internet sites from government agencies, chemical manufacturers and suppliers, and many other searchable sites.
  • Molecule of the Month
    History, physical data, use and importance of numerous molecules, most of them organic, contributed each month since 1996. Note additional links to molecule descriptions at the end.
  • Molecular Weight Calculation
    Type in a molecule's formula, get the molecular weight and other physical data. No frills website.
  • NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
    Authoritative guide to industrial hygiene information for several hundred chemicals with links to RTECS (Registry of Toxicological Effects of Chemical Substances) and other toxicological data sites.
  • NIST Chemistry WebBook
    Authoritiative, critically evaluated information from the National Institute of Standards and Technology on structure, formula, and much additional data, seachable by chemical name, CAS number, formula, etc.
  • The Orbitron: A Gallery of Orbitals on the WWW
    By energy level, colorful images representing atomic orbitals and molecular orbitals, plus animated plots of wave functions and electron density and more.
  • United States Patent and Trademark Office: Google Advanced Search for Patents
    Get the text (image or full-text) of United States patents issued since 1790 by keyword in title or text, patent number or inventor. Since August 2012, European patent documents are accessible as well.
  • WebElements Periodic Table
    Clickable elements on the periodic table provide more data on physical properties, history, uses and more for each element.
  • Wired Chemist
    Developed by Professor Claude Yoder of Franklin & Marshall College, a site providing an introduction to chemistry, modules on important topics in chemistry, demonstrations of laboratory techniques, NMR spectral data and problems, animations, and laboratory tutorials.
  • Links for Chemists: The WWW Virtual Library for Chemists
    Maintained by the University of Liverpool Department of Chemistry, this provides an extensive list of links to valuable websites in many areas of chemistry.
  • Yahoo's Index of Chemistry Links
    Search for information by chemistry subject categories or by keyword.

Springer E-book Collection

https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://www.springerlink.com
Description: 

SpringerLink is a collection of e-books covering topics in technology, sciences and medicine. The COD Library provides access to titles published between 2005-2010. Recent materials on these subjects can be located using the COD library catalog.
Chapters from this collection can be downloaded in PDF to read off-line.

Off-campus Availability: 
Students, Faculty, and Staff
Full-text Content: 
Includes full-text content
This is a trial: 
No
Suppress: 
No

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - chemistry