biology

Biology 1100: Gibbs

quagga mussel.jpg
Welcome! Click on a tab below to find books, articles, and websites for use in this course.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of these resources from off campus.

Questions? Feel free to contact me, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat Want to know more about the COD library? Check out our orientation video.

Image Credit: USGS: ''Dreissena bugensis''
  1. Pick a Topic
  2. Find Articles
  3. Use Websites
  4. Find Videos
  5. APA Style

Finding (and Narrowing) a Topic

Have a glimmer of a topic that you'd like to work on? Great! You'll want to work to narrow that topic a bit before you dive into the catalog and databases, or you will be swamped with results. You can try the following strategies to narrow a topic:

  • Visit CQ Researcher, a library database that summarizes current events into massive PDFs.
  • Gale Virtual Reference Library has got great entries on many of your topics.
  • A Google news search can give you headlines from around the world on topics like "invasive species Illinois."

Still Drawing a Blank?

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The College of DuPage library has several print magazines/journals that you can browse through for inspiration. For example, try looking at headlines in:

  • American Forests
  • Mother Earth News
  • Science News
  • Audubon
Recent magazines and periodicals are located on the second floor of the SRC, right in front of the Media Lab.

Finding Articles in Databases

Scientific research can be best found in academic databases. Here are the top two databases to look for information.

Academic Search Complete has a mixture of popular and scholarly articles on a variety of subjects. You'll want to be sure that you're using a source appropriate for class when searching.

US Major Dailies has the full text of a number of the country's major newspapers. Make sure to limit to newspapers and sort by relevance when using the databases.

See the full list of biology databases.


Evaluating Websites

While you're doing Google searches to either narrow your topic or in order to dig up more information on certain subject, you want to be careful to decide if the information you find is trustworthy.

When it comes to science, nearly everyone has opinions: should we be labeling genetically modified food for consumer's awareness? What will fracking do for our economy or our groundwater supply? Your job is to evaluate the information you can find through Google and Bing to find the good websites--those written by authors you can trust, with good and up-to-date information.

Authorship: Who created this website? What is their background on the topic? Are they trustworthy?

Bias: Why was the website created? What point of view does the author have? Does that limit the facts they present or how the facts are presented?

Date: How old is the information that is presented? Is it still accurate?

Questions? Check out the COD Library's guide to evaluating information.


Class Exercise

Take a moment to look at your website. Is this information trustworthy? How do you know? Be prepared to tell your classmates your opinion.

Frequently Asked Questions on Genetically Modified Food
GMO Facts: Frequently Asked Questions
Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs): Transgenic Crops and Recombinant DNA Technology
The Facts About GMOs

Finding Videos

Evaluate videos in the same way that you evaluate websites: thinking about Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/Point of View.

That said, there are some interesting youtube channels that you can check out for class:

Using APA Style

Find directions about how to cite your sources on the library citation guide.

Most databases will have a Cite link that you can also click to get article citations.

Finally, you are welcome to use NoodleBib if you'd like to use a program to create and organize your citations. You must "Create a New Folder" when you use NoodleBIB for the first time. Click on "I am citing a(n):," choose the type of item you are citing, and then fill in the online form. Your bibliography will be formatted for you.

Further questions about APA style? Check out the APA Style Blog, which includes sample papers.

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Biology 1100: Fancher

white_baneberry.jpg
Welcome! Click on a tab below to find books, articles, and websites for use in this course.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of the resources below from off campus. If your card is not working, it may need to be reactivated.

Questions? Feel free to use my contact info to the right, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat.

Image Credit: Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
  1. Finding A Topic
  2. Finding Articles
  3. Use Websites
  4. MLA Citation Style

Getting Started: Finding (and Narrowing) a Topic

Have a glimmer of a topic that you'd like to work on? Great! You'll want to work to narrow that topic a bit before you dive into the catalog and databases, or you will be swamped with results. You can try the following strategies to narrow a topic:

Finding Articles in Databases

Scientific research can be best found in academic databases. Here are the top two databases to look for information.

Academic Search Complete has a mixture of popular and scholarly articles on a variety of subjects. You'll want to be sure that you're using a source appropriate for class when searching.

Academic OneFile is a great place to find a mixture of scientific and popular articles as well. Just like in Academic Search premier, make sure that you're using a good source for this project while searching.

See the full list of biology databases.


Evaluating Websites

While you're doing Google searches to either narrow your topic or in order to dig up more information on certain subject, you want to be careful to decide if the information you find is trustworthy.

When it comes to science, nearly everyone has opinions: are we getting enough Vitamin D? What will fracking do for our economy or our groundwater supply? Your job is to evaluate the information you can find through Google and Bing to find the good websites--those written by authors you can trust, with good and up-to-date information.

Authorship: Who created this website? What is their background on the topic? Are they trustworthy?

Bias: Why was the website created? What point of view does the author have? Does that limit the facts they present or how the facts are presented?

Date: How old is the information that is presented? Is it still accurate?

Questions? Check out your professor's guide to evaluating information or the COD Library's guide to evaluating information.


Class Exercise

Take a moment to look at your website. Is this information trustworthy? How do you know? Be prepared to tell your classmates your opinion.

The Crushing Cost of Climate Change
Cutting Short-Lived Climate Pollutants
US 'Climate Hubs' to Save Farms from Extreme Weather
Wildlife in a Warming World: Confronting the Climate Crisis
Hot Air on Climate Change

MLA Citation Style

Start by heading to the library citation guide.

You can also use NoodleBib to create your citations. Remember to create a personal username and password the first time you log in.

The Purdue OWL website has an excellent MLA guide that will give you common citation formats.

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BIO 1100: Thomas

swamp milkweed.jpg
Welcome! Click on a tab below to find books, articles, and websites for use in this course.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of the resources below from off campus. If your card is not working, it may need to be reactivated.

Questions? Feel free to use my contact info to the right, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat.

Image Credit: Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
  1. Scientific Paper Structure
  2. Subject Research

Scientific Paper Structure

The basic structure of a scientific research paper is similar to that of a lab report you'd turn in for class. You'll see most scientific papers broken into the following sections:

  • Introduction: includes a literature review
  • Methods: describes how the experiment was conducted
  • Results: the data retrieved from the experiment
  • Discussion: the section that analyzes the data
  • Conclusion: restates the importance of the research findings and points toward new directions for research
  • Citations: lists all referenced important articles that guided the research

More questions? Check out the Reading Research Articles link on the right.


Using Bioscience

Your professor has suggested Bioscience as a model for your scientific paper writing. You can find current issues of Bioscience in print in the library or online.

Doing Subject Research

Starting Out: Developing a Topic

One of the most important steps you can take is to narrow your topic by gathering background information. This will suggest research words, important developments in the field, and even important scientists whom you can search for when you're looking for work. You can find this type of information in several ways.

Reference books such as those found in the library will give you a start. For example, check out the following:

You can also use Google to give you an idea about keywords and names to use in the databases.


Adding Detail: Using Databases to Find Articles

Scientific research can be best found in academic databases. Here are the top two databases to look for information.

Science Direct is one of the premier databases to find scientific research. Nearly everything listed here is a scientific research article. Be sure to select "Subscribed Journals" when searching, or you will get a lot of citations without full-text.

Academic Search Complete has a mixture of popular and scholarly articles on a variety of subjects. You'll want to be sure that you're using a source appropriate for class when searching.

See the full list of biology databases.


Need some help with Citations?

Find directions about how to cite your sources on the library citation guide.

Most databases will have a Cite link that you can also click to get article citations.

Finally, you are welcome to use NoodleBib if you'd like to use a program to create and organize your citations. You must "Create a New Folder" when you use NoodleBIB for the first time. Click on "I am citing a(n):," choose the type of item you are citing, and then fill in the online form. Your bibliography will be formatted for you.

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Biology 1100: Clampitt

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Welcome! Click on a tab below to find books, articles, and websites for use in this course.

You'll need a College of DuPage Library card in order to use most of the resources below from off campus. If your card is not working, it may need to be reactivated.

Questions? Feel free to use my contact info to the right, stop by the Reference Desk, or contact us by email or chat.

  1. Lab 2
  2. Lab 3
  3. Lab 4
  4. Lab 5 & Alternate Labs

Lab 2: Environmentally Responsible Advertising

To get started, think like an advertiser: if I wanted to get my message out to people concerned with the environment, what magazines would they tend to read?
national parks magazine.PNG

  • American Forests
  • audobon magazine.PNG

  • Mother Earth News
  • Audubon
  • environmental magazine.PNG

  • National Geographic
  • Backpacker
  • National Parks
  • Discover
  • National Wildlife
  • E: The Environmental Magazine
  • Scientific American
Recent magazines and periodicals are located in the main walkway, past the circulation desk and across from the popular DVD section.

Lab 3: Environmental Impact Of Natural And Man-Made Disasters

Getting Started: Reference Books

Encyclopedia of Disaster Relief 2011. Online. Use the search within box at the right of your screen (below the encyclopedia title), not the top left search box in order to get good search results.

Environmental Disasters: a Chronicle of Individual, Industrial and Governmental Carelessness General GE 140 .D383 1998

Failed Technology General TA 169.5 .F74 1995

You can also use the Gale Virtual Reference Library to get more info about your topic.


Creating Your Own Searches: Finding Books

Click on Catalog in the top green toolbar. Try adding some keywords for your topic:

  • Natural Disasters
  • Volcanoes
  • Earthquakes
  • Acid Rain
  • Endangered Species

Be sure to manage your search results as necessary: are you looking for books, ebooks, DVDs? What dates are appropriate for your search?

catalog search.PNG


Creating Your Own Searches: Finding Articles

Click on Databases on the green toolbar at the top of your screen. Your top choices are

Academic OneFile. Type in your topic. Try narrowing using the "Related Subjects" box on the left of your screen.

Academic Search Premier has a lot of scientific, popular, and scholarly info.

Newspaper Source: includes the Chicago Tribune, the New York Times, and other major newspapers, and so has a mix of local, national, and global information.
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TRY IT: Zebra mussels

Lab 4: Chemicals in the Environment: Agriculture and Food Industries

Pesticides and Herbicides

You can start this project in a couple of ways:

  1. Go to your local hardware store or garden center and check the active ingredients in pesticides and herbicides to make a list of possibilities to explore.
  2. Earth-Wise Guide to Toxicity Ratings lists generally available pesticides with toxicity ratings created by the Texas Cooperative Extension Service and City of Austin.

Now, find more background information

Kamrin, M. A., ed. Pesticide Profiles: Toxicity, Environmental Impact, and Fate. 1997. Call Number: Reference RA 1270 .P4 K285 1997

Sittigs Handbook of Pesticides and Agricultural Chemicals. 2005. ebook from Knovel database.

National Pesticide Information Center is a website that will let you search through the alphabetical listing for your pesticide active ingredient or go to the General Factsheets for easy-to-understand information on a number of pesticides. The technical fact sheets give more advanced information, especially on health risks.

Database:
Knovel contains Chemical and Food Additive data from many respected reference works.

TRY IT: Resmethrin (active ingredient in Raid)


Food Additives

You can get started on this project in four ways:

  1. Check foods you eat regularly for preservatives and other additives listed
  2. The Food and Drug Administration Food Additive lists additives by use (and, often, product).
  3. Use the Federal Government's Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) List. . Check the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR), Chapter 21 Parts 182, 184 and 186.

Books to use

Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology. Online.
Foods & Nutrition Encyclopedia. 2 vols. Call number: General TX 349 . F575
Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials. Online.

Databases:

Micromedex
Type in name of chemical on search line. May get data on MSDS, poison considerations, reproductive effects, and other health issues. See handout at the bottom of the screen for access.

Knovel has chemical and food additive data from many respected reference works.

Specific Internet Sites:

Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Chemicals
Gives access to company-provided information on the safety and health effects of thousands of chemicals when handled in bulk.

Hazardous Substances Data Bank
Comprehensive, peer-reviewed toxicology data for about 5,000 chemicals. Excerpts of relevant data. Must locate original source for full information.


Search the Internet

If you want to see sites with information about an additive (or pesticide), use a search engine, such as Google or Yahoo or science gateway such as Scirus.

In most search engines, use quotation marks ("....") around phrases or + before words that must be present in any Internet site retrieved. Example: + "sodium bisulfite" +health

Remember that these topics have attracted a wide range of opinions. To help determine if a website is good or not, check out the COD Library's guide to evaluating information.

Lab 5: Environmental Issues In The News

If you don't have access to enough newspapers and magazines on your chosen topic at home, you may want to use those in the library. See Lab 3 for ideas on how to research topics in magazines and newspapers.

If using databases, watch for articles on your environmental topic that have fulltext or PDF so that you can print the articles for your project booklet.

You can photocopy articles from Library periodicals that you want to include. Don't forget to take the information you need so that you can cite your source (Name of author, Title of Article, Journal name, Date, Pages)

Alternative Lab: Alternative Energy Sources

See Lab 3 for ideas on how to research topics in magazines and newspapers. Some headings to use: Solar power, Wind energy, Geothermal Resources.

Alternative Lab: Environmental Collage Poster

Be sure to have a theme for the collage elements you choose.

Biological Sciences Class Guides

Biology

Biology icon
Welcome to the Biology Research Guide.

Click on a tab below to find books, videos, articles, and websites for use in Biology classes.

If you need additional help, stop by the Reference Desk or contact a reference librarian.

  1. Books, Models, & Videos
  2. Databases and Journals
  3. Websites


Finding Books

Use the COD Library catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current College of DuPage Library card to check out books.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic. Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a College of DuPage Library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.

Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

Models

The library has a large collection of models that can be checked out for student use at Main Circulation Desk on the second floor of the SRC. Check out our updated list of Anatomy Models. Browse by type of model or search by a specific model (AKA "stomach").

Videos

The Library owns many Biology films in DVD, VHS and streaming formats. Microscope slides for Biology 1100 and Biology 1151/1152 are also available for student use in the Library. Check the list of titles at:

Find videos related to Health and Diseases at:

Slides

Here's our list of biology slides:

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Access the article databases listed below.

Best Bet links: Databases and Journal Holdings

Websites

  • Cells Alive
    Fine images of many types of cells, explanations of cell structure, and animations of cell division phases.
  • Encyclopedia of Life
    Collaborative encyclopedia providing basic information and links across the web to species from across the kingdoms of life.
  • Integrated Taxonomic Information System
    Authoritative taxonomic information for plants, animals, fungi and microbes of North America and the world. Includes accepted and non-accepted names, taxonomic hierarchy for kingdom to species, and links to Google images and other web resources.
  • Scitable
    Scitable is a free science library from Nature Publishing Group. Essays and illustrations on important topics in genetics and cell biology (with links to Nature journal articles), career information and more are provided.
  • Seven Biological Challenges
    Links to essays by noted researchers and useful websites in areas of biotechnology, evolution, environment and more.
  • LUMEN: Loyola University Medical Center Zoomified Histology
    Examples and explanations using hundreds of slides to illustrate 22 topics in histology. Includes lab practical self-quiz feature. Be sure to look at links to other websites under "Histology on the Internet."
  • Virtual Cell Animation Collection
    Watch youtube videos that show the cell processes for glycolyis, mitosis/meiosis, photosynthesis and more.
  • The Virtual Library: Biosciences
    Extensive list of links to valuable websites in many areas of the biological sciences.
  • GLANIS is a database created by NOAA and several other organizations that lists invasive and range expanding species in the Great Lakes. Narrow by type of species and/or by lake watershed.

Springer E-book Collection

https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://www.springerlink.com
Description: 

SpringerLink is a collection of e-books covering topics in technology, sciences and medicine. The COD Library provides access to titles published between 2005-2010. Recent materials on these subjects can be located using the COD library catalog.
Chapters from this collection can be downloaded in PDF to read off-line.

Off-campus Availability: 
Students, Faculty, and Staff
Full-text Content: 
Includes full-text content
This is a trial: 
No
Suppress: 
No

Knovel Library

https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://app.knovel.com

To view Knovel books, be sure that you are using the most current version of your web browser and that you have a current version of Flash. Need help? Contact Denise Cote at 630-942-2092 or email cotede@cod.edu

Description: 

This database is a cross-searchable collection of electronic books covering many subjects in technology, engineering, applied technology, science, chemistry and physics and much more.

Off-campus Availability: 
Students, Faculty, and Staff
Full-text Content: 
Includes full-text content
Note: 

Customer ID C000053284
Requester/Client ID: 3b5efa68d2680dd5bc5e2ea7e7d4f3cda50c9fa1
SUSHI Server URL - https://commander.knovel.com/sushi

This is a trial: 
No
Suppress: 
No

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