Health Sciences

Diagnostic Medical Imaging Guide

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This guide is a starting point for locating Diagnostic Medical Imaging books, videos, journal articles, CEUs, images and credible websites.
The menu on the right will help you research, locate, evaluate and cite resources.

Ask Your Health Science Librarian

Do you need help finding information on a specific topic? In addition to using our face-to-face, online and phone Ask A Librarian options, you may call or email me to set up an appointment or to explain what you need (I can often help you via email). Please remember that while I can assist you in finding information and can educate you about locating and citing quality health resources, I cannot diagnose or recommend treatment for specific conditions or diseases. I also cannot interpret assignments--ask your instructor! I will always refer specific medical and assignment-related questions back to your health care provider or instructor. Your questions will be kept in confidence and your privacy will be respected.

Accreditation Reports

EKG Guide

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This guide is a starting point for locating EKG-related books, videos, journal articles, images and credible websites.
Use the tabs below and menu on the right to research, locate, evaluate and cite resources.

Ask Your Health Science Librarian

Do you need help finding information on a specific topic? In addition to using our face-to-face, online and phone Ask A Librarian options, you may call or email me to set up an appointment or to explain what you need (I can often help you via email). Please remember that while I can assist you in finding information and can educate you about locating and citing quality health resources, I cannot diagnose or recommend treatment for specific conditions or diseases. I also cannot interpret assignments--ask your instructor! I will always refer specific medical and assignment-related questions back to your health care provider or instructor. Your questions will be kept in confidence and your privacy will be respected.

  1. Books & Videos
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Use the Library catalog to search the COD Library's collection of books, videos, e-books, and streaming media. Use your COD Library card to check these items out or access them online.

Get a C.O.D. Library Card

  • 24/7 access to our full-text electronic books and article databases
  • Check out videos, books, software, anatomical models
  • reserve small group study rooms
  • FREE book and article Interlibrary Loans (ILL) if we don't have the resources that you need
  • Cards are FREE for C.O.D. students and 502 community members
  • Learn more...

Browsing the Collection

An easy way to start searching the Library catalog is to do a keyword search for words that describe your topic. You may need to experiment with keywords to find ones that work for your topic. Try a keyword search for ekg OR ecg. Once you find some items, you can use subject headings to find other items that cover the same topic.

Use this subject to browse the General Collection and the Reference Collection.

Electrocardiography

Another strategy is to search by call number. Health-related materials are shelved in the "R" section of libraries that use the Library of Congress classification system. EKG books are located in the call number range RC683.5.E5. Do you like to physically stand in front of a shelf of books and browse for the right one(s)? If so, go to the RC683.5.E5 section of the stacks in our Library and see what we have to offer! There are two locations for "print" or physical material (videos or software) in the C.O.D. Library: the reference collection (items don't leave the Library) and the general stacks (items that you can take home). Library staff members will be happy to help you find books in either section--just ask!

Reference Materials

Reference materials are well indexed, up-to-date, concise, and highly credible. They provide overviews, definitions, specific information (such as causes & symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, prognosis, etc) or addresses. Types of reference books include: directories, dictionaries and encyclopedias, basic health books (describing diseases and conditions), and drug resources. Since you cannot normally take these materials home, remember that you will have to photocopy, or write down the information that you need. Some reference materials are available full text, online via our databases. Below are some examples of the types of reference books found in the C.O.D. reference collection.

Some of these resources are designed for consumers (such as the Johns Hopkins or Mayo Clinic health books), some for health students and consumers (the Gale Encyclopedia series), and some for health professionals (Cecil or Harrison's), so the type and level of information differs to suit each audience. Some reference works are available in Spanish language versions.

small yellow star.jpgBest Bets

Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary
REF R 121.D73 ONLINE ACCESS

small yellow star.jpgGale Encyclopedia of Medicine
REF RC 41 .G35 ONLINE ACCESS*
* Simultaneously search all of the specialized Gale Encyclopedias available via the Gale Virtual Reference Library database

Melloni's Illustrated Medical Dictionary
REF R121 .D76

Merriam-Webster Online Medical Dictionary (select medical reference, includes audio pronunciations)

small yellow star.jpgGoldman's Cecil Medicine
REF RC46 .C423

Conn's Current Therapy
REF RM101 .C87

Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment
REF RC71 .A14

small yellow star.jpgHarrison's Principles of Internal Medicine
REF RC46 .H333

Located in the GENERAL stacks is another useful book containing illustrations and text pertaining to various heart conditions:
The Ciba collection of medical illustrations: Volume 5, The Heart
GENERAL QM25 .N472 v.5

Use databases to locate journal, magazine, newspaper or specialized articles. You can use your COD Library card to download articles from off-campus.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search by a variety of fields, like title, author's name, subject or keyword. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our databases are free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: Article Databases by Subject

small yellow star.jpgBest Bets

Academic Search Complete
Academic Search Complete contains indexing and full text for 9,100 journals. 7,100 of these journals are peer-reviewed scholarly titles. This collection provides both popular and scholarly journal coverage for nearly all academic areas of study - including social sciences, humanities, education, computer sciences, engineering, physics, chemistry, language and linguistics, arts & literature, medical sciences and ethnic studies.

Care Notes
Care Notes helps medical professionals educate patients about certain conditions. Contains 2500 English and 2500 Spanish documents that address patient condition, treatment, follow-up care, psychosocial issues, continuing health, and the most frequently administered drugs.

CINAHL
The online version of Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, CINAHL Complete covers nursing, allied health, biomedical and consumer health journals, publications of the American Nursing Association, and the National League for Nursing. It now includes the CINAHL Thesaurus and full text of over 1300 important nursing and clinical journals as well as over 130 Evidence-based Care Sheets; nearly 170 Quick Lessons providing Overviews of Disease and Conditions; 170 Continuing Education Modules; and full text for 360 Research Instrument Records.

small yellow star.jpgGale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL)
GVRL is a collection of online reference books on a variety of topics including Business, History, Literature, Medicine, Social Science, Technology and many more.
individual entries from these resources can be printed and emailed.

small yellow star.jpgHealth Source: Consumer Edition
This resource provides access to nearly 300 full text, consumer health periodicals. This database also includes searchable full text for more than 1,000 health-related pamphlets and more than 140 health reference books. Also contains 7,000 Clinical Reference Systems reports (in English and Spanish); Clinical Pharmacology, which provides access to 1,100 drug monograph entries and 2,700 patient education fact sheets; and Stedman’s Medical Dictionary. This database covers topics such as AIDS, cancer, diabetes, drugs & alcohol, aging, fitness, nutrition & dietetics, children’s health, women’s health, etc. The magazine and journal articles in this database range from "popular" or recreational reading to scholarly, peer-reviewed publications.

Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition
This resource provides 600 scholarly full text journals focusing on many medical disciplines. Coverage of nursing and allied health is particularly strong. In addition, this database includes the Clinical Pharmacology database, providing access to up-to-date, concise and clinically relevant drug monographs for all U.S. prescription drugs, hard-to-find herbal and nutritional supplements, over-the-counter products and new drugs.

small yellow star.jpgMedlinePlus
MedlinePlus has extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other trusted sources on over 900 diseases and conditions. There are also lists of hospitals and physicians, a medical encyclopedia and a medical dictionary, health information in Spanish, extensive information on prescription and nonprescription drugs, health information from the media, and links to thousands of clinical trials.

Browse all COD Library Health databases

ANYONE can put information on the Internet. ANYONE. As a health care provider, you must carefully select and evaluate medical/health information before using it to treat patients or letting it influence how you perform your duties. Use the evaluating sources section of this guide to help you determine the credibility of Web sites. A great final test is to ask yourself, "Would I want myself or someone that I care deeply about to be treated based on this information?" If the answer is "no," don't include such non-credible information in your academic projects either!

small yellow star.jpg"Best Bet" General Medical Information Websites

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
CDC.gov provides users with credible, reliable health information on topics such as: data and statistics; diseases and conditions; emergencies and disasters; environmental health; healthy living; injury, violence and safety; life stages and populations; travelers' health; workplace safety and health; and much more. This site contains information appropriate for adults, teens and kids

MayoClinic.com
Easy-to-understand information on health and medical topics, all reviewed for accuracy by Mayo Clinic experts. Content includes interactive resources and tools, information on specific diseases and disorders, management of particular chronic conditions, suggestions for healthy lifestyles, consumer drug information, first aid, specialists' answers to frequently asked questions about diseases and health decision-making guides. (A service of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

small yellow star.jpgMEDLINEplus
Provides access to 900+ health topics, medical encyclopedias and dictionaries, and links to self-help groups, clinical trials, preformulated PubMed searches, lists of hospitals and physicians, health and information in Spanish and other languages. Includes listings of diseases & conditions by body system.

MedScape Reference
An online clinical reference providing in-depth drug & disease information and tools to support clinical decision making. Content is designed for practicing medical professionals and includes diagnostic medical images. Free Registration to MedScape is required. To avoid registering and go straight to an entry in this resource, try Googling the word emedicine and your disease/condition (i.e. emedicine teratoma).

small yellow star.jpg"Best Bet" Heart-Related Information Websites

You can use a search engine like Google or Bing to search specific heart diseases/conditions and related ECG/EKG tracings by typing "DISEASE and (ECG or EKG)" or using the disease name and searching via the image interface. Examples of how to cite images in APA style can be found on the COD Citing Sources page.

The Alan E. Lindsay ECG Learning Center
An interactive ECG tutorial providing an introduction to clinical electrocardiography from the Univerity of Utah School of Medicine

American Heart Association
The American Heart Association aims to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The website offers a wealth of information for heart patients and their families

Blaufuss Multimedia Heart Sounds and Cardiac Arrhythmias
Explore heart sounds, cardiac arrhythmias, and electrocardiograms with these free, interactive audio/visual tutorials

small yellow star.jpgECG Library
An electrocardiogram (ECG / EKG) is an electrical recording of the heart and is used in the investigation of heart disease. This library is a collection of realistic looking recordings which will help improve ECG reading skills

Web MD: Heart Disease Health Center
Contains a wide-variety of heart-related information ranging from disease/condition types and symptoms, to treatment and prognosis, and lifestyle changes and nutrition

Yale: Introduction to Cardiothoracic Imaging
Cardiac and pulmonary anatomy, images and imaging techniques, interactive graphics, and case studies

Phlebotomy Guide

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This guide is a starting point for locating phlebotomy-related books, videos, journal articles, images and credible websites.

Use the tabs below and menu on the right to research, locate, evaluate and cite resources.

Ask Your Health Science Librarian

Do you need help finding information on a specific topic? In addition to using our face-to-face, online and phone Ask A Librarian options, you may call or email me to set up an appointment or to explain what you need (I can often help you via email). Please remember that while I can assist you in finding information and can educate you about locating and citing quality health resources, I cannot diagnose or recommend treatment for specific conditions or diseases. I also cannot interpret assignments--ask your instructor! I will always refer specific medical and assignment-related questions back to your health care provider or instructor. Your questions will be kept in confidence and your privacy will be respected.

  1. Books & Videos
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Use the COD Library catalog to search the COD Library's collection of books, videos, e-books, and streaming media. Use your COD Library card to check these items out or access them online.

Get a C.O.D. Library Card

  • 24/7 access to our full-text electronic books and article databases
  • Check out videos, books, software, anatomical models
  • reserve small group study rooms
  • FREE book and article Interlibrary Loans (ILL) if we don't have the resources that you need
  • Cards are FREE for C.O.D. students and 502 community members
  • Learn more...

Browsing the Collection

An easy way to start searching the Library catalog is to do a keyword search for words that describe your topic. You may need to experiment with keywords to find ones that work for your topic. Try a keyword search for phlebotomy. Once you find some items, you can use subject headings to find other items that cover the same topic.

Use these subjects to browse the General Collection and the Reference Collection.

Phlebotomy
Phlebotomy Examinations Questions Etc

Another strategy is to search by call number. Health-related materials are shelved in the "R" section of libraries that use the Library of Congress classification system. Phlebotomy books are located in the call number range RB45.15. Do you like to physically stand in front of a shelf of books and browse for the right one(s)? If so, go to the RB45.15 section of the stacks in our Library and see what we have to offer! There are two locations for "print" or physical material (videos or software) in the C.O.D. Library: the reference collection (items don't leave the Library) and the general stacks (items that you can take home). Library staff members will be happy to help you find books in either section--just ask!

Reference Materials

Reference materials are well indexed, up-to-date, concise, and highly credible. They provide overviews, definitions, specific information (such as causes & symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, prognosis, etc) or addresses. Types of reference books include: directories, dictionaries and encyclopedias, basic health books (describing diseases and conditions), and drug resources. Since you cannot normally take these materials home, remember that you will have to photocopy, or write down the information that you need. Some reference materials are available full text, online via our databases. Below are some examples of the types of reference books found in the C.O.D. reference collection.

Some of these resources are designed for consumers (such as the Johns Hopkins or Mayo Clinic health books), some for health students and consumers (the Gale Encyclopedia series), and some for health professionals (Cecil or Harrison's), so the type and level of information differs to suit each audience. Some reference works are available in Spanish language versions.

small yellow star.jpgBest Bets

Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary
REF R 121.D73 ONLINE ACCESS

small yellow star.jpgGale Encyclopedia of Medicine
REF RC 41 .G35 ONLINE ACCESS*
* Simultaneously search all of the specialized Gale Encyclopedias available via the Gale Virtual Reference Library database

Melloni's Illustrated Medical Dictionary
REF R121 .D76

Merriam-Webster Online Medical Dictionary (select medical reference, includes audio pronunciations)

small yellow star.jpgGoldman's Cecil Medicine
REF RC46 .C423

Conn's Current Therapy
REF RM101 .C87

Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment
REF RC71 .A14

small yellow star.jpgHarrison's Principles of Internal Medicine
REF RC46 .H333

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search by a variety of fields, like title, author's name, subject or keyword. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our databases are free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: Article Databases by Subject

small yellow star.jpgBest Bets

Academic Search Complete
Academic Search Complete contains indexing and full text for 9,100 journals. 7,100 of these journals are peer-reviewed scholarly titles. This collection provides both popular and scholarly journal coverage for nearly all academic areas of study - including social sciences, humanities, education, computer sciences, engineering, physics, chemistry, language and linguistics, arts & literature, medical sciences and ethnic studies.

Care Notes
Care Notes helps medical professionals educate patients about certain conditions. Contains 2500 English and 2500 Spanish documents that address patient condition, treatment, follow-up care, psychosocial issues, continuing health, and the most frequently administered drugs.

CINAHL
The online version of Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, CINAHL Complete covers nursing, allied health, biomedical and consumer health journals, publications of the American Nursing Association, and the National League for Nursing. It now includes the CINAHL Thesaurus and full text of over 1300 important nursing and clinical journals as well as over 130 Evidence-based Care Sheets; nearly 170 Quick Lessons providing Overviews of Disease and Conditions; 170 Continuing Education Modules; and full text for 360 Research Instrument Records.

small yellow star.jpgGale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL)
GVRL is a collection of online reference books on a variety of topics including Business, History, Literature, Medicine, Social Science, Technology and many more.
individual entries from these resources can be printed and emailed.

small yellow star.jpgHealth Source: Consumer Edition
This resource provides access to nearly 300 full text, consumer health periodicals. This database also includes searchable full text for more than 1,000 health-related pamphlets and more than 140 health reference books. Also contains 7,000 Clinical Reference Systems reports (in English and Spanish); Clinical Pharmacology, which provides access to 1,100 drug monograph entries and 2,700 patient education fact sheets; and Stedman’s Medical Dictionary. This database covers topics such as AIDS, cancer, diabetes, drugs & alcohol, aging, fitness, nutrition & dietetics, children’s health, women’s health, etc. The magazine and journal articles in this database range from "popular" or recreational reading to scholarly, peer-reviewed publications.

Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition
This resource provides 600 scholarly full text journals focusing on many medical disciplines. Coverage of nursing and allied health is particularly strong. In addition, this database includes the Clinical Pharmacology database, providing access to up-to-date, concise and clinically relevant drug monographs for all U.S. prescription drugs, hard-to-find herbal and nutritional supplements, over-the-counter products and new drugs.

small yellow star.jpgMedlinePlus
MedlinePlus has extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other trusted sources on over 900 diseases and conditions. There are also lists of hospitals and physicians, a medical encyclopedia and a medical dictionary, health information in Spanish, extensive information on prescription and nonprescription drugs, health information from the media, and links to thousands of clinical trials.

Browse all COD Library Health databases

ANYONE can put information on the Internet. ANYONE. As a health care provider, you must carefully select and evaluate medical/health information before using it to treat patients or letting it influence how you perform your duties. Use the evaluating sources section of this guide to help you determine the credibility of Web sites. A great final test is to ask yourself, "Would I want myself or someone that I care deeply about to be treated based on this information?" If the answer is "no," don't include such non-credible information in your academic projects either!

small yellow star.jpg"Best Bet" General Medical Information Websites

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
CDC.gov provides users with credible, reliable health information on topics such as: data and statistics; diseases and conditions; emergencies and disasters; environmental health; healthy living; injury, violence and safety; life stages and populations; travelers' health; workplace safety and health; and much more. This site contains information appropriate for adults, teens and kids

MayoClinic.com
Easy-to-understand information on health and medical topics, all reviewed for accuracy by Mayo Clinic experts. Content includes interactive resources and tools, information on specific diseases and disorders, management of particular chronic conditions, suggestions for healthy lifestyles, consumer drug information, first aid, specialists' answers to frequently asked questions about diseases and health decision-making guides. (A service of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

small yellow star.jpgMEDLINEplus
Provides access to 900+ health topics, medical encyclopedias and dictionaries, and links to self-help groups, clinical trials, preformulated PubMed searches, lists of hospitals and physicians, health and information in Spanish and other languages. Includes listings of diseases & conditions by body system.

small yellow star.jpgMedScape Reference
An online clinical reference providing in-depth drug & disease information and tools to support clinical decision making. Content is designed for practicing medical professionals and includes diagnostic medical images. Free Registration to MedScape is required. To avoid registering and go straight to an entry in this resource, try Googling the word emedicine and your disease/condition (i.e. emedicine teratoma).

WebMD
Provides valuable health information, tools for managing your health, and support to those who seek information

small yellow star.jpg"Best Bet" Diagnostic Medical Test Websites

ARUP: Laboratory Test Directory
ARUP's Laboratory Test Directory contains complete, up-to-date test information, including methodology and reporting times, collection and transportation specifications, reference intervals, test notes, and CPT codes. Clients can access entries via an A to Z index located in the upper-right section of the site and search by test name, key word, test number, or mnemonic.

Harvard Medical School: Guide to Diagnostic Tests
Answers questions such as: What are the tests for? How do they work? How do I prepare? How long before I get results?

small yellow star.jpgLab Tests Online
Designed to help the patient or caregiver better understand that many clinical lab tests are part of routine care as well as diagnosis and treatment of conditions and diseases. The site is a collaboration of professional societies representing the lab community

Laboratory Testing
Produced by pathologists, this site offers access to interpretations of laboratory tests and surgical pathology reports. A wealth of information about diseases, tests, and laboratory procedures

Merck Manual: Common Medical Tests
Provides the normal test result ranges for blood tests as well as a chart of diagnostic procedures, body area tested and descriptions

Citing Your Sources

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Debra's APA Citation Tips

You are responsible for learning and using the APA style guidelines when formatting your paper and citing your resources. There are many resources available to assist you with APA, so be proactive and seek the help that best fits your needs.

Are you struggling with APA style because you lack the computer (word processing) skills to create margins, annotations, block indents, headings, or double spacing? Check out the short, FREE, highly-visual computer tutorials available from GCFlearnfree.org
gcflearnfree.jpg

  • The site includes computer basics and software tutorials on Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and OpenOffice.org as well as social media
  • Tutorials on most versions of Office are available
  • Quickly access step-by-step directions, screen shots and short video-clips of how to perform various software functions
  • Remember that your basic formatting questions can be answered by the Library’s Computer Support Print Services staff as well as Reference staff

Think about APA style requirements and gather citation information while you research.Don't wait until the end of the writing process to do your citations. A large amount of student stress arises from having to back track and relocate images and resources in order to acquire citation details. I recommend that you do one or more of the following:

  1. Use the COD Library APA Citing Sources pages: https://cod.libguides.com/citing/apa
    • It contains examples of how to cite images including diagnostic images
    • An annotated bibliography may be required as a part of your coursework
    • If required, annotated bibliographies should be double-spaced
    • Content of annotations varies dependent upon assignment and instructor preference. For example, many COD instructors require that in 3-5 sentences you explain two things in your annotated bibliography: 1.) the reasons why you think the source is credible (see Debra's evaluating sources guide) and 2.) how this resource fits into your final project (it has has overview information, it provides treatment options, etc). APA does not specify the content of annotations so be sure to check with your instructor about what should be included.
    • The formatting of annotations can vary. Some guides suggest that annotations should be block indented five spaces, other guides recommend block indenting five spaces plus two (for a total of seven spaces). NoodleBib annotations use the seven space block indent format. Check with your instructor for preferred formatting.
  2. Participate in a free APA workshop sponsored by the Library for hands-on practice and assistance: http://library.codlibrary.org/sos
  3. Get a writing handbook or an APA style guide like these examples (remember that there are many more resources available in the COD Library or online):
    • Online Writing Lab (OWL) from Purdue Universitysmall yellow star.jpg

      • Little Brown Handbook
        • Ready Reference, General: PE1112 .L58  2010 
      • Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6TH ed.)
        • General & Reference: BF76.7 .P83 2010
  4. Make an appointment with the Learning Commons' Writing, Reading, Speech Assistance (WRSA) area. Check out their APA paper template and writing guides

  5. Utilize the citation tool, NoodleTools (linked from the COD Library Citing Sources page). NoodleTools provides integrated online tools for note-taking, outlining, citation, document archiving/annotation, and collaborative research and writing.

Evaluating Health & Medical Sources

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Tips to Finding
Quality Information
on the Internet

  • Isolate the key concepts and words to be searched, including word variations and synonyms
  • Determine the type of information needed (general or technical information? Adult audience or children/adolescents?)
  • Use a search engine like Google http://www.google.com/ and Yahoo http://www.yahoo.com or take advantage of established, pre-selected Internet collections like C.O.D’s Health Sciences & Nursing research guides http://codlrc.org/research or MEDLINEplus http://www.medlineplus.gov/
  • Carefully evaluate the credibility of the source and the quality of the information retrieved
  • For evaluation tips and information, see below

Evaluating Electronic & Print Medical Information

Information adapted from the Nebraska S.T.A.R. Manual

The Internet has become a popular outlet for finding medical information. Many consumers consult the Web first for their medical information needs. Although the Web does offer a wide variety of valuable information, [researchers] must exercise caution because the Web contains many unreliable sites as well. Whether utilizing a print resource (like a book or journal article) or an electronic source like an article on a Web site, researchers should always take the time to critically analyze the source for credibility.  Emphasis should be put on evaluating the following areas:

Authorship/Authority: Is the site maintained by a credible organization, physician, or university? Is it by an individual with a disease or disorder who is putting up his/her personal experiences? Although on a support level, the latter might be useful to a consumer, the former would be more likely to give out objective and accurate information.

Bias: Is the site objective, or is it trying to sell products that will ease the woes of the consumer's condition? Again checking authorship might be essential here, as a drug company might take a different outlook on a disease than a non profit organization would. Having a philosophical or bio-ethical viewpoint does not negate the validity of a site, but rather can foster debate and examination of issues. However, it is preferable that a site should clearly represent its persuasion.

Content/Scope: What type of information is contained in the site? Is it annotated and is it comprehensive or does it cover a specific area of a topic? The reference interview will help you determine if the client’s needs are better suited by a comprehensive overview or a more tailored content site.

Currency: How current is the Web site? Does it give a "last updated" message? If not, it is questionable how timely the site is. Perhaps they have put up the site and never maintained it.

Ease of Use: Is the Web site easy to navigate? Do the links work and is the site designed so as to have self-explanatory categories? Are the graphics too large or cumbersome and does the site load quickly or slowly? Many people get annoyed and impatient with sites that take too long to load or have dead links. This is an important consideration.

Level: Is the site intended for professionals or consumers? What is the reading level of the material? Is it intended for adults or children?

Purpose: What does the site intend to do? Give objective facts and information, sell something, or persuade?

Reliability/Accuracy: Does the site include references to back up its claims?

Uniqueness: Does what the site offers have certain value? Does it contain material that either cannot be found elsewhere or presents it in a better way than other sources?

 

Dental Hygiene Books, Videos & Models

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Books, Videos & Models

Use the Library catalog to search the COD Library's collection of books, videos, e-books, models, and streaming media. Use your COD Library card to check these items out or access them online.

If the COD Library doesn't have the items that you need, faculty and students can borrow the book from participating I-Share Libraries. If neither COD nor any of the I-Share libraries own the book that you need, COD's Interlibrary Loan (ILL) service is free for library card holders.

Reference Materials

Reference materials are current, well indexed, organized, concise, and highly credible. They provide overviews, definitions, specific information and additional resources. Types of reference books include: directories, dictionaries and encyclopedias, basic health books (describing diseases and conditions), and drug resources. Unless a reference work is in an electronic format such as an e-book, remember that you will have to photocopy, or write down the information that you need because print reference books remain in the Library.

Sample Reference Materials:
Gale Encyclopedia entries found in the Gale Virtual Reference Library (full-text, online encyclopedias)
Stedman's Dental Dictionary: Illustrated REF RK27 .S744

Search Strategies

Call Number Ranges

Use these call numbers to browse the General and Reference Collection shelves.

RK Dentistry
RK 60.7 - 60.8 Preventative
RK 280 Oral and Dental Anatomy and Physiology
RK 301 - 493 Oral and Dental Medicine, Pathology, and
Disease

Keyword Searches

Do a keyword search of the Library catalog using words that are specific to your topic. Try using specific keywords, such as proper names, combining several keywords, or using keyword phrases. For example:

  • (anesthe* OR anaesthe*) AND dental
  • blood type AND diet
  • Robert Atkins
  • paleo diet
  • OSHA AND dent*
  • emergencies AND "dental office*"
  • For more tips on creating keyword searches, see the Journal Articles section of this guide

Subject Searches

Do a subject search of the Library catalog using some of the subject headings listed below:

  • Dental Assistants
  • Dental Hygiene
  • Dental Hygienists 
  • Dental Ethics
  • Mouth Diseases
  • Nutrition and Dental Health
  • Periodontics
  • Reducing Diets
  • Teeth

Anatomical Models

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Anatomical Models (HTML link) (and nutrition models) are available at the main Library circulation desk.

Dental Hygiene Journals

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Journal Articles

The Library provides access to many online article databases that will help you locate journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. You can search by keyword, subject, author and title.

You must have a valid College of DuPage library card to access the electronic indexes and databases from off-campus.

Newspaper Databases
Includes Chicago Tribune, New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and more

Databases by Subject
Choose an database according to your subject of interest.

  • Begin your research in the Health and Medicine Databases
    • Each database contains different resources (journals, e-books, magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, etc.) Run your search in several databases. Read the database descriptions to locate databases most relevant to your search.

    Database (and Library catalog) Advanced Search Tips

    • Use the features of the database (print, navigation) before going up to the Explorer bar and using the back or print buttons
    • For keyword searching, use the advanced search feature so that you can use multiple terms and set limits (date range, peer-reviewed, full text, etc)
    • Remember that databases require you to spell correctly
    • To limit your search results to journals with editorial boards (or some type of review process by health professionals) look under the “limit” section of the initial search page. Select the option to limit to peer reviewed (some databases also call them refereed publications). Refereed publications and peer reviewed are synonyms for board-reviewed or scholarly journals. Don’t forget to set your date limits too!
    • When creating your search strategy, take a moment to write down your key words and any synonyms (alternative words meaning the same thing) that might be used. Also think about how you connect your key words together.
      • Connect different concepts with the word AND indicating that you want both concepts to appear in each retrieved article.
      • Connect variations (different words could be used for the same thing) with OR indicating that at least one variation should occur in the articles retrieved.
      • Put parentheses around actions that you want to be done first (just like you may have done in an algebra class).
      • Here are some examples of synonyms and “nesting” (using parentheses):
      • dental AND (caries OR cavities)
      • (radiogr* OR xray* OR x-ray* OR diag* imag*)
      • Put the key concepts together like this example:
        dental AND (caries OR cavities) AND (radiogr* OR xray* OR x-ray* OR diag* imag*)
    • capitalize connecting words (AND, OR) to let the database know that you are giving a command not just listing a word to be found
    • Use an asterisk (*) to find all possible endings. For example, imag* finds image, images, imagery, imaging

Dental Hygiene Websites

thumb_toothpaste.JPGBelow are some helpful Dental Hygiene-related Web Sites. The College of DuPage and the COD Library do not create or control any of these resources, and they will not be held responsible for misuse of information or any adverse effects of recommendations stated in these resources. Health Information should always be discussed with your health care provider, who can interpret it for you and apply it to your individual case.

Accreditation

Commission on Dental Accreditation (Part of the American Dental Association)

Associations

American Academy of Periodontology (AAP)

American Association of Orthodontics

American Dental Assistants Association

American Dental Association*
*includes a wide-range of educational resources for health consumers.

American Dental Education Association

American Dental Hygienists’ Association*
*includes educational resources for health consumers including kids

Illinois Dental Hygienists' Association (IDHA)

National Association of Dental Laboratories

National Dental Association

Dental Continuing Education Sites

ADHA Continuing Education

Dental Continuing Education from dentalcare.com

Hygienetown

Illinois Dental Hygienists' Association (IDHA)

Inside Dental Hygiene

Dental Academy of Continuing Education

Dental Employment Sites

ADHA Career Center

Bureau of Labor Statistics: Current Dental Hygienists Occupational Employment and Wages

Illinois Career Information System:
From home, login as a guest by choosing town name from a dropdown list, add zip code
Search for Dental Hygienists under Occupations
The wages section includes data for specific Illinois counties

COD Library's Chicago Area Job Sites (Scroll down to view)

Dentalworkers.com

U.S. Department of Labor/Occupational Outlook Handbook

U.S. Department of Labor/Occupational Outlook Handbook: Dental Hygienists

Dental Health Sites for Patients (Consumers)

Academy of General Dentistry: Know Your Teeth

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

CDC Oral Health Resources

Dental Image Sites

DermNet NZ: Mouth Problems
Covers skin conditions of the mouth (oral mucosa, including lips, gums and tongue).

Oral Pathology Review Images (VCU Libraries Digital Collections)

OPRM Atlas of Oral Pathology - University of Iowa College of Dentistry

Nutrition

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
With over 100,000 members, the Academy is the nation's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. It serves the public by promoting optimal nutrition, health and well-being

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics : Home Food Safety
Food safety tips for consumers (some resources are available in Spanish)

COD Library's Nutrition Research Guide
Nutrition-related resources (print, electronic and Internet resources) from the College of Dupage Library's Natural Science Librarian

Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) fact sheets
Provides "a current overview of individual vitamins, minerals and other dietary supplements. ODS has fact sheets in two versions—Health Professional and Consumer. Both versions provide the same types of information but vary in the level of detail. Consumer [fact sheets] are now available in Spanish."

Food and Nutrition Information Center (FNIC)
Delivers credible, accurate, and practical resources for nutrition and health professionals, educators, government personnel, and consumers.

MEDLINEplus National Library of Medicine
Search for nutrition-related health topics such as: calcium; child nutrition; cholesterol; dietary fats; dietary fiber; eating disorders; food labeling; infant and toddler nutrition; nutrition for seniors; nutritional support; obesity; vegetarianism; vitamins and minerals; weight loss and dieting; and food, nutrition and metabolism

Nutrition.gov
A gateway to the U.S. government offices' information on nutrition, healthy eating, and physical activity

USDA Food Composition Databases
Use the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference to "find nutrient information on nearly 8,000 foods using this search page. You can now search by food item, group, or list to find the nutrient information for your food items."

World Health Organization (WHO): Nutrition
Provides information on the numerous nutrition activities supervised by WHO including: growth assessment and surveillance, nutrition in development and crisis, country-focused nutrition policies and programs, and reduction of micronutrient malnutrition

Need Help?

Ask Your Health Science Librarian!

Do you need help finding information on a specific topic? Call or email me to set up an appointment or to explain what you need (I can often help you via email). Please remember that while I can assist you in finding information and can educate you about locating and citing quality health resources, I cannot diagnose or recommend treatment for specific conditions or diseases. I also cannot interpret assignments--ask your instructor! I will always refer specific medical and assignment-related questions back to your health care provider or instructor. Your questions will be kept in confidence and your privacy will be respected.

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