Religion

The Day of the Dead

278096984_5b0d9d5c4d_z-2.jpg
"Day of the Dead on cafe window," Señor Codo, Creative Commons, 2006

Celebration, history, spiritualism, and culture

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday celebration of honoring spirits of dead people who come to visit the physical world on October 31—children come on November 1st and adults on the 2nd. It’s origins are a Christian-indigenous mix, with roots in Catholicism and Mesoamerican religions. Activities include Mass and feasts at graveyards. The day is similar to the Euro-American Halloween in aesthetics but has a different emphasis and feel; for example, it's not a day to be scared of dead people or be afraid of ghosts, but to greet any ghost you may encounter as a friend. Images of loved ones and indigenous persons are often venerated next to codified religious saints and divine beings. There were times when holiday-related images became political satire motifs. It’s a way for people to celebrate cultural identity and maintain their heritage while away from their ancestral homeland.

Research Guide Prepared by Joshua Snyder, Dominican University GSLIS Practicum Student

Search Terms

Search terms are words and phrases that help you think about your topic in different ways, and they help you in your research. The list below are some search term ideas that can narrow or broaden your research. You can get it to get your brainstorm on and for putting on search boxes in database search engines:

Mexico
America
United States
Politics
Religion
Spiritualism
Catholicism
Food
Art
Culture
Aztec
Cartoons
Tattoos
Family
Relatives
Syncretism
Subversion
Colonialism

JSTOR Articles

Stanley Brandes, “Sugar, Colonialism, and Death: On the Origins of Mexico's Day of the Dead”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/179316
Provides an historical overview of religious practices and connects with social identity currently.

Stanley Brandes, “The Day of the Dead, Halloween, and the Quest for Mexican National Identity”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/541045
Good for comparing the traditional Mexican holiday with the European spiritualism we have in America today and how each element forms cultural identity.

Betty Brown, “Vive tu Recuerdo: Living Traditions in the Mexican Days of the Dead”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/3335859
A type of catalogue for activities and beliefs regarding the holiday.

Olivia Cadaval, ‘"The Taking of the Renwick": The Celebration of the Day of the Dead and the Latino Community in Washington, D. C.’ | http://www.jstor.org/stable/3814391
A place study good for comparing practices and ideas in one location in the United States with another location in the Americas (which would require another source).

Neal Krause, Elena Bastida, “Exploring the Interface between Religion and Contact with the Dead among Older Mexican Americans”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/25593769
Study of a specific demographic regarding necro-communication; good for dialogue with Day of the Dead practices.

Project MUSE Articles

Katarzyna Mikulska Dąbrowska, “"Secret language" in oral and graphic form: religious-Magic Discourse in Aztec speeches and manuscripts”
| https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
Although the title doesn’t name the celebration, this study includes the Day of the Dead by engaging with ways cultures preserve tradition, and may provide prototypes from ancient civilizations for current practices.

Pamela Bastante and Brenton Dickieson, “Nuestra Señora de las Sombras: the enigmatic identity of Santa Muerte”
| https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
This article discusses quasi-divine Santa Muerte, a prominent figure in Day of the Dead spiritualism.

Linda Greenberg, “Learning from the dead: wounds, women, and activism in Cherríe Moraga’s Heroes and saints”
| https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/melus/v0...
Analyzing a play, Greenburg discusses the way persons used images of death to communicate rebellion against oppression from colonial, economic, and sexist forms; although not explicitly naming the holiday, this is a concrete example of public experience of death and identity formation.

Regina Marchi, “Hybridity and Authenticity in US Day of the Dead Celebrations”
| https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
Arguments concerning multiple celebrations in various locations and comparing them to what the author considers “authentic”.

Carleen D. Sanchez, “The apotheosis of Frida and Ché: secular saints and fetishized commodities”
| https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
Frida, a figure representing pre-European Central America, often features in Day of the Dead iconography, and Che represents modern struggles for liberty; this is good for seeing how icons of national identity such as these are turned into objects for profit, and how that change damages cultural identity.

COD Books

Stanley Brandes, Skulls to the living, bread to the dead: the day of the dead in Mexico and beyond
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/64208213
This provides a history and coverage of practices, including art and spiritualism, of the holy day, in Mexico and other countries.

Elizabeth Carmichael and Chloë Sayer, The skeleton at the feast: the Day of the Dead in Mexico
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/25177425
This is an overview of the holy day’s history and is exclusive to Mexico.

Janet Esser, Behind the mask in Mexico
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/17295550
This focuses on the costumes used in Mexico to show the holiday activities and its history.

John Greenleigh, The days of the dead: Mexico's festival of communion with the departed
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/38030302
Greenleigh expounds the identity Mexicans cultivate by keeping close relationships with dead community members.

Carol Gnojewski, Day of the Dead: a Latino celebration of family and life
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/55086013
This exposition includes practices, a little history, and is demonstrates how pan-national identity is built with the celebration in the Latin@ community.

Shawn D Haley, Day of the Dead: when two worlds meet in Oaxaca
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/52269678
Haley studies the people in Oaxaca and shows their beliefs about the world, moving into their practices of the Day of the Dead, demonstrating the relationship that the people in Oaxaca have with dead community members through time.

Jack Santino, Halloween and other festivals of death and life
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/28549780
Santino compares the religious beliefs and common practices of Halloween with the Day of the Dead, regardless of location or ethnic group.

John Lynch, New worlds : a religious history of Latin America
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/757838308
Lynch provides a history of Latin America’s religious phenomena, which is more broad than most of these sources but a bit more focused than Roof’s book.

Regina M Marchi, Day of the Dead in the USA : the migration and transformation of a cultural phenomenon
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/17295550
A cultural and historical exposition that shows how immigration of Latin Americans keep their identity in a foreign nation through practicing the Day of the Dead.

Wade Roof, Contemporary American religion
| http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/38030302
Roof provides an overarching summary of major American religious beliefs and practices; very introductory but can help give a basic idea of each religion for comparison.

Websites

“Day of the Dead Educational Activity Guide,” Mexic-Arte Museum
| http://www.mexic-artemuseum.org/images/uploads/education/Day_of_Dead_Guide.pdf
Provides a short curriculum of activities and sources for educating children about the Day.

“The Day of the Dead ofrenda: a heartfelt work of art,” Inside Mexico
| http://www.inside-mexico.com/ofrenda.htm
Exposition of a particular popular traditional object of religious significance created just before and for the Day.

“Dia de los Muertos,” National Geographic
| http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/media/dia-de-los-muert...
A good introduction to the history and practices of the Day of the Dead.

“Calaveras of José Guadalupe Posada,” Political Domain Review
| http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/the-calaveras-of-jose-guadalup...
Demonstrates how religious symbolism became a powerful tool in the hands of an artist to make political statements—a case study of one artist.

“Day of the Dead honors the deceased: holiday’s focus different than Halloween’s,” About Education
| http://www.press.uchicago.edu/books/turabian/turabian_citationguide.html
Provides a brief overview of the differences between Halloween and Day of the Dead, focusing on family member relationships.

“A Mexican Day of the Dead party,” Fine Cooking
| http://www.finecooking.com/menus/day-of-the-dead.aspx
Gives a menu with traditional cuisine.

“Altar images: US Day of the Dead as political communication,” eScholarship University of California
| http://escholarship.org/uc/item/8574v2sk#page-1
Concerned with only the US, Marchi shows how Day of the Dead images play a political role in a community.

Mexican Sugar Skull
| http://www.mexicansugarskull.com
Focusing on one Day of the Dead candy image, this website is dedicated to the holiday’s art and food tradition.

Other Materials

Jorge Alderete, Day of the Dead: El Dia de Los Muertos, Korero: Chicago, 2011.
| http://www.ipgbook.com/the-day-of-the-dead-products-9781907621017.php?pa...

Mary J. Andrade, Through the eyes of the soul, Day of the Dead in Mexico, Michoacan. 1996.
| http://www.dayofthedead.com/through-the-eyes-of-the-soul-day-of-the-dead...

Mary Andrade, The Vigil of the Little Angels” in P’urhepecha and Spanish, Special Edition
| http://www.dayofthedead.com/the-vigil-of-the-little-angels-in-p-urhepech...

Phil Cushway, Art of the dead
| http://www.amazon.com/Art-Dead-Phil-Cushway/dp/1593765029

Day of the dead 2.jpg
"Noche de Muertos" by Ute Hagen, Creative Commons, artist copyright 2009

Project Muse

https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://muse.jhu.edu/search

To limit your searches to the journals available through the COD Library, check the "Only content I have full access to" box on the left side of your results page.

Description: 

Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

Off-campus Availability: 
Students, Faculty, and Staff
Full-text Content: 
Includes full-text content
This is a trial: 
No
Suppress: 
No

Cultural Diversity Resources

thumb_diversity.JPG

Locating Resources

Materials on the subject of cultural (including racial, ethnic, minority, and religious) diversity in health care can be found a variety of ways.

Using the COD Library Catalog:

Try keyword searches:
cultur* AND competent* AND health
nurs* AND religion
nurs* AND culture*
nurs* AND diversity AND cultur*
(transcultural OR multicultural) AND (nurs* OR treatment)
Try subject searches:
transcultural nursing
transcultural medical care
social medicine
ethnic groups -- medical care
minorities -- medical care
health -- religious aspects

Or, use a subject search for the country or ethnic group being researched and select appropriate sub headings, such as social life and customs, social conditions, health beliefs and practices, medical practices and treatments, or health practices. Medical practices or health traditions may also be a chapter or section in general books on the country or ethnic group of interest or in health professional or nursing books (for example, try the subject: nursing assessment). In these books, consult the index at the back of the book for specific traditions or practices

Select Book Resources

These are but a few of numerous books pertaining to cultural diversity and health care. Check the Library Catalog for item location within the Library (i.e. Ebook, General, Circulation Desk, Course Reserves).

Achieving cultural competency: a case-based approach to training health professionals
RA418.5.T73 A24 2009

Bilingual health communication: working with interpreters in cross-cultural care
RA418.5.T73 2016

Caring for Hindu patients
RA485 .C37 2008

Caring for patients from different cultures, 5th ed
RT86.54 .G35 2015

Cultural diversity in health and illness
RA418.5.T73 S64 2017

Cultural perspectives on mental wellbeing: spiritual Interpretations of symptoms in medical practice
RA418 .T63 2017

Culturally competent care
RT86.54 .C858 2011

Encyclopedia of world cultures
E-book

Essentials of health, culture, and diversity: Understanding people, reducing disparities
RA418 .E327 2013

Global health care: issues and policies
RA441 .G573 2017

Handbook of religion and health, 2nd ed.
BL65.M4 K597 2012

Health disparities, diversity, and inclusion: context, controversies, and solutions
RA563.M56 R67 2018

Leininger's culture care diversity and universality: a worldwide nursing theory
RT86.54 .C85 2015

Providing health care in the context of language barriers: international perspectives
R119.5 .P76 2017

Religion: A clinical guide for nurses
E-book

Spirituality in nursing: standing on holy ground
RT85.2 .O37 2018

Teaching cultural competence in nursing and health care: inquiry, action, and innovation
RT86.5 .J442 2016

Transcultural health care: a culturally competent approach
RA418.5.T73 T73 2013

Transcultural concepts in nursing care
RT86.54 .A53 2016

Transcultural nursing: Assessment and intervention
RT86.54 .T73 2017

Select Database Resources

CultureGrams
Culturegrams is a core reference resource on understanding the world's peoples through the documentation of the unique details of their customs, traditions, and daily life. Covered topics include diet and health.

Select MultiMedia Resources

These are but a few of COD Library's multi-media resources pertaining to cultural diversity and health care. Check the Library Catalog for item availability.

Competent care in a culturally diverse nation (DVD 30 min.)
CIRC DESK RT86.54 .C667 2012 & Streaming video
Adapts care interventions to the cultural needs and preferences (ethnic and religious beliefs, values, and practices) of diverse clients. Provides practical and effective methods of recognizing and dealing with the special needs of different cultures

Cultural awareness in healthcare. / Understanding the need (DVD 17 min.)
CIRC DESK RA418.5.T73 C843 2014 pt.1
Discusses the importance of cultural awareness in the healthcare field. Explains some of the cultural differences that exist among patient populations. Examines some of the major cultural awareness studies that have been completed over the past 60 years, as well as the components of several key models that are designed to foster cultural awareness within the healthcare system

Cultural awareness in healthcare. / An action plan (DVD 17 min.)
CIRC DESK RA418.5.T73 C843 2014 pt.2
Discusses the importance of cultural awareness in the healthcare field. Explains the importance of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate care. Describes the CLAS standards put forth by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Outlines the three categories within the CLAS standards: culturally aware care, language access, and organizational support. Discusses how to establish and implement an action plan that recognizes and enforces the CLAS standards

Cultural awareness in healthcare. /Your practice (DVD 18 min.)
CIRC DESK RA418.5.T73 C843 2014 pt.3
Describes the importance of cultural awareness in the healthcare field. Discusses the importance of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate care. Explains key, specific ways for providing appropriate care to different ethnic groups, including people from Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America

Cultural issues in the clinical setting: Series A and B (1 VHS + 1 CD-ROM 70 min.)
GENERAL RA418.5.T73 C86 2002 & RA418.5.T73 C86 2002 CD-ROM
SUMMARY: Contains ten trigger "case studies," five of which deal with obstetrical themes, such as lesbian parents; Hmong birth practices; gender and acculturation issues in Iranian immigrants; a Latina diabetic in labor; and a circumcised Somali woman in labor. Other issues covered include problems with using family interpreters, Southeast Asian refugee psychosomatic issues, sickle cell problems with a black teenager in the E.R., conflicting cultural values between parents and physicians in a pediatric asthma case, problems with a digital rectal exam with a black male patient, and a gay teenager coming out to his family practice physician
CONTENTS: Series A : Diabetic complicance - Latino (Scene A 7:15 Scene B 9:14) -- Sickle cell case in the ER (4:43) -- Pediatric asthma (7:09) -- A somatic complaint (6:07) -- Prostate (3:55) -- A gay adolescent (11:19) -- Series B : Beyond obstetrics : birthing issues - four cultural perspectives (18:20)

The multicultural health series: part 1 (1 VHS + 1 CD-ROM 40 min.)
GENERAL RA418.5.T73 M95 pt.1 2003 & RA418.5.T73 M95 pt.1 2003 CD-ROM
Topics include changes in an elderly patient's care provider, an elderly Navajo faces surgery, an Orthodox Jewish couple has a Saturday baby, and a pediatrician learning to use telephone interpreting
CONTENTS: Walking in beauty (12:14) -- Day of rest (9:49) -- Changes (8:48) -- The voice inside the phone (9:09)

The multicultural health series: part 2(1 VHS + 1 CD-ROM 48 minutes, 19 seconds)
GENERAL RA418.5.T73 M95 pt.2 2004 & RA418.5.T73 M95 pt.2 2004 CD-ROM
SUMMARY: Topics include an American physician mediates issues around the death of a young Malaysian Chinese girl with her family, a physician assistant confronts the family abuse of a South Asian woman, a middle-class white male physician and a working-class male heart attack patient experience communication difficulties, a medical team works through compliance and medication issues with Afghan refugees, a doctor finds that his semi-literate but well-intentioned Columbian immigrant patient and her husband are using a plethora of South American drugs in addition to their prescribed medications, and a physician assistant helps his pregnant Latina patient find a way to deal with her STD re-infection problem
CONTENTS: Rebirth (11:00) -- A pocketful of medicines (5:43) -- Proof (6:52) -- Between two worlds (8:37) -- Lupe's dilemma (8:07) -- Lost oppportunities (7:52)

Worlds apart (4 VHS tapes (46 min., 54 sec.)
CIRC DESK RA448.4 .W67 2003
Shows how cross-cultural conflicts arise and how they can affect health decisions and outcomes. Discusses language barriers, cultural and religious beliefs, racial and ethnic disparities in health care, and reasons for non-adherence to medications.
CONTENTS: Mohammad Kochi's story (14 min, 6 sec.) -- Justine Christena's story (11 min., 20 sec.) -- Robert Phillip's story (18 min., 8 sec.) -- Alicia Mercado's story (11 min., 20 sec.)

In the Nursing Education in Video database, search for "cultural awareness" to retrieve and view current streaming videos. (This database includes: full transcripts of each video program that are keyword searchable, easy playlist and clip making functionality, permanent embeddable URLs for easy use in online courses).

Multicultural Internet Resources

American Indian Health
"Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine, this site is designed to bring together health and medical resources pertinent to the American Indian population including policies, consumer health information, and research. Links are provided here to an assortment of documents, Web sites, databases, and other resources."

ANA (American Nurses Association) Nursing World: Diversity Awareness
Provides diversity information in the areas of obesity/bariatrics, geriatrics, health insurance and healthcare access, LGBT individuals and communities, mental health, racial and ethnic minorities, and faith, religion & spirituality

Culture Cues™
"Tip sheets for clinicians, designed to increase awareness about concepts and preferences of patients from the diverse cultures served by University of Washington Medical Center."

Diversity RX
Provides resources and information on how to meet the language and cultural needs of minorities, immigrants, refugees, and other diverse populations seeking health care.

EthnoMed
Sponsored by the Harborview Medical Center at the University of Washington in Seattle, contains information about cultural beliefs and medical issues pertinent to the health care of recent immigrants to Seattle. Includes cultural profiles for Hispanic/Latinos, Iraqis, Eritreans, Somalis, Cambodians, Vietnamese, and others as well as foreign language patient materials

Gay & Lesbian Medical Association (GMLA)
GLMA's mission is to ensure equality in health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals and health care providers

Health Care and Religious Beliefs--Alberta [Canada] Health Services
A 2009 fifty-page PDF document containing concise overviews of 14 religions' particular spiritual and religious requirements pertaining to healthcare

HealthReach: Health Information in Many Languages
From the National Library of Medicine, "Discover resources, cultural backgrounds, clinical tools, and guidance about specific immigrant, refugee, and asylee populations."

Multi-Cultural Resources for Health Information
From the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and the National Library of Medicine, this directory of web resources for health information covers many areas of interest to those serving diverse populations. Topics include cultural competency, data, translation and interpretation, funding, law, refugees and more.

National LGBT Health Education Center: Resources and Suggested Readings
The National LGBT Health Education Center provides educational programs, resources, and consultation to health care organizations with the goal of optimizing quality, cost-effective health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

Office of Minority Health
The Office is dedicated to improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations including: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

The Provider's Guide to Quality & Culture
Joint project of Management Sciences for Health (MSH), United States Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration and Bureau of Primary Health Care. "This Web site is designed to assist healthcare organizations throughout the US in providing high quality, culturally competent services to multi-ethnic populations."

SPIRAL (Selected Patient Information Resources in Asian Languages)
Maintained by Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library, a collection of links to Asian-language patient care documents that have been created by authoritative sources and are freely available on the World Wide Web. Links are organized by topic and language.

Think Cultural Health
Sponsored by the Office of Minority Health, this site offers the latest resources and tools to promote cultural and linguistic competency in health care including the National CLAS Standards. Access free and accredited continuing education programs as well as tools to help provide respectful, understandable and effective services.

Transcultural and Multicultural Health Links
Links to general resources dealing with transcultural health and health care for various religious faiths including the Amish, Jehovah's Witnesses, and Islam, and ethnic groups, including Hmong, Thai, and Cambodian

Sikhism

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.

Confucianism

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.

Taoism (Daoism)

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.

  • BBC Religions-Taoism
  • The British Broadcasting Corporation's website on Taoism offers a general overview of Taoism's beliefs, ethics, history, people, practices, subdivisions and texts.

  • Daoist Iconography Project
  • "The Daoist Iconography Project 道教圖像學計畫 (DIP) provides an international research database for the study of visual representations of the Daoist pantheon and their contexts of use in Daoist ritual traditions, illustrated scriptures, and popular culture."

  • Encyclopedia.com
  • Encyclopedia entries from a number of credible encyclopedias.

  • Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - Taoism
  • Scholarly, peer-reviewed and lengthy article entry on Taoism.

  • Taoism and the Arts of China
  • The Art Institute of Chicago's website that features art that illustrates Taoist daily life. Includes images, a historical timeline and a bibliography of Taoism-related books.

  • Taoism Directory
  • Directory of links to Taosim-related primary and secondary sources.

  • Tao Te Ching
  • Link to the Tao Te Ching, Translated by Derek Lin.

Buddhism

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites & Podcasts

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.


Podcasts

Hinduism

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.

  • Heart of Hinduism
    The Heart of Hinduism is produced by the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) and provides links to information on the concepts, practice, lifestyle and tradition of Hinduism.

  • Hinduism Today
    This website focuses on Hindu culture, tradition and current events.
  • Internet Sacred Text Archive: Hinduism
    Translations of notable primary source Hindi documents, including the Vedas, Upanishads and Purana.

  • Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies
    Published by Oxford University, this website features downloadable lectures on a number of Hinduism-related topics such as Hindu Theology, Modern Hinduism and Hindu traditions.

Islam

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.

  • Al-Islam.org
    Site includes information on Islam, Muslim practices, Spirituality, and a timeline of Islamic history. Note the "Discover Islam" and "DILP Projects" tabs at the top of the page.

  • Internet Islamic History Sourcebook
    Links to significant historical events and cultures related to the development of Islam. Produced and maintained by Paul Halsall Fordham University

  • Internet Sacred Text Archive - Islam
    Translations of notable primary source texts, including the Qur'an, Hadith, and Sufi texts.

  • Islam and Islamic Studies Resources Created and maintained by Dr. Alan Godlas, Professor, University of Georgia, this website provides links to resources on the study of Islam, the Qur'an, Islamic history, theology and philosophy, as well information on current events and politics.
  • WhyIslam.org
    WhyIslam.org, produced by volunteers from the Islamic Circle of North America, provides information on Islam, Allah, the Prophets, the Qur'an and Muslims in society.

Judaism

  1. Books
  2. Databases
  3. Websites

Please note: Additional resources related to the study of Judaism can be found in the Old Testament Research Guide.

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. Click on the "keyword" tab to search using multiple search terms and limit your results by material type (book, video), date, or language. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

I-Share

I-Share allows you to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains several books on religion. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on Religion. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Project Gutenberg E-books

Project Gutenberg provides access to a number Religion-related e-books. Many can be read online or downloaded to e-book readers.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic topics in religion.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://codlrc.org/databases

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Click here to view a list of Religion-related journals


Websites

Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

The following websites have been evaluated for their credibility.

  • Internet Jewish History Sourcebook
  • Broad collection of resources on Jewish history, including the People of Israel, Jewish Middle Ages and Jewish Life since the Enlightenment. Produced and maintained by Paul Halsall Fordham University

  • Internet Sacred Text Archive - Judaism
  • Translations of notable primary source documents related to Judaism, including the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), Talmud and Mishna texts.

  • Jewish Encyclopedia
    The Jewish Encyclopedia, written between 1901-1906, contains over 15,000 articles and illustrations. Note that recent events in modern Jewish History, such as the establishment of Israel, are not covered.

  • Judaism and Jewish Resources - Jewish Studies
  • Compilation of Jewish Studies-related websites that focus on Jewish history, language and culture.

  • Torah.org: Project Genesis Web Site
  • Concentrating on the teaching of the Torah, this site has sections on Ethics and Jewish Law. Note that many of the sections contain information organized by basic, intermediate and advanced levels.

Pages

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