history

History Draft 1120 Western Civilization Since 1600

History Course Outlines and Resources

Why Textbooks Cannot Fulfill the Goals of a College-Level History Course

Our goal as history instructors is to teach students how to think critically about historical events, to draw conclusions based on evidence, and to teach students how to formulate their own understanding of the world through a method of inquiry and analysis. The history survey textbook is used by many college instructors in the classroom. However, it falls far short of the goal of helping students to think for themselves.

Read this essay, written by Sam Mitrani, which highlights the ways in which the textbook fails our students, and suggests how teaching with other readings can promote student engagement...

History Course Outlines without Textbooks

Below find a list of history classes with suggested course outlines and resources. Feel free to use any or all elements of the course syllabus and/or resources for your own courses.

History 2260 - United States Since 1945
History 1120 - Western Civilization since 1600

History Test 2260-030

History 2260 Course Syllabus

  1. The Cold War
  2. Post-War Boom
  3. The Black Movement
  4. Feminism
  5. Chicano Movement/Immigration
  6. Latin America in the ‘80s
  7. U.S. In the World after Vietnam
  8. Economic Changes Since the 1970s
  9. War in Afghanistan and Iraq
  10. 2008 Financial Crisis

List of History Course Outlines and Resources


Post-War Boom

Brecher: http://www.prole.info/texts/strike_wwii.html

Reuther: http://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/17/books/last-of-his-kind.html?pagewanted...

Between the Hills and the Sea excerpt above, called Gilden. Once open, click on arrows at the top right of the screen and rotate clockwise to make readable.
Gilden, K. B. 1971. Between the Hills and the Sea. [1st ed.]. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.
https://cod.on.worldcat.org/oclc/159345?databaseList=638
(As you can see, I've included the citation to the book. Since our site is open, we can't post copyright protected materials. One option is that we could put the reading on physical course reserve).

Father Knows Best episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Bl4oQiMsK4&list=PL7Pd2tFaAGUNJ_pZdv8zpM...

Redbook on the suburbs: http://archive.org/details/IntheSub1957

A Word to the Wives: http://archive.org/details/Wordtoth1955

Salt of the Earth: http://archive.org/details/clacinonl_SaltOfTheEarth

Indigenous Populations and Globalization in the Americas

Indigenous Populations and Globalization in the Americas

Insert Introductory text here

Readings: http://bit.ly/1PF6WsW

Sallqa Ayllu (Community of Nature)

Insert Introductory text here

  1. Climate Change
  2. Sustainability
  3. Pollution
  4. Land Rights

"Amid Gas, Where Is the Revolution?
By Bret Gustafson
Citation:
Gustafson, Bret. "Amid Gas, Where Is The Revolution?." NACLA Report On The Americas 46.1 (2013): 61-66. Academic Search Complete. Web. 19 July 2016.

"Bolivia to Host 2015 Meeting of Social Movements to Fight Climate Change"
By Richard Fidler
Summary: Richard Fidler reacts to the perceived failure of the UN's COP20 climate talks by proposing an alternative summit to address climate change.
Citation: Fidler, Richard. “Bolivia to Host 2015 Meeting of Social Movements to Fight Climate Change.” socialistproject.ca. N.p., 17 Dec. 2014. Web. 19 July 2016.

"Environmental Destruction is a Result of the Capitalist System." ( Scroll to center of page to view article).
By Evo Morales
Summary: Evo Morales invokes indigenous spirituality and values as the moral grounds for climate change agreements.
Citation: Morales, Evo. “Environmental Destruction is a Result of the Capitalist System.” socialistproject.ca. N.p., 17 Dec. 2014. Web. 19 July 2016.

Put your content for Tab 2 here. Intro

Put your content for Tab 3 here. Intro

"Ecuador Indigenous Leader fFound Dead Days Before Planned Lima Protest." By Jonathan Watts.
Summary: December, 2014 article on suspicious death of Ecuadorian Shuar land rights activist José Isidro Tendetza Antún
Citation: Watts, Jonathan, Latin America correspondent, and and Dan Collyns. “Ecuador Indigenous Leader Found Dead Days before Planned Lima Protest.” The Guardian 6 Dec. 2014. The Guardian. Web. 19 July 2016.

"'Indigenous Peoples Are the Owners of the Land' Say Activists at COP20."
By Milagros Salazar
Summary: In Dec. 2014, widows of murdered leaders of the Asháninka community of Alto Tamaya Saweto of Peru and other indigenous rights activists raised their voices in protest at COP20 in Lima, demanding formal title to native lands.
Citation: “‘Indigenous Peoples Are the Owners of the Land’ Say Activists at COP20 | Inter Press Service.” N.p., n.d. Web. 19 July 2016.

Auki Ayllu (Community of Deities, Gods)

Insert Introductory text here

  1. The Arts
  2. Spirituality
  3. Philosophy

Put your content for Tab 1 here.

Environmental Destruction is a Result of the Capitalist System. ( Scroll to center of page to access article).
Summary: Evo Morales invokes indigenous spirituality and values as the moral grounds for climate change agreements.
Citation: Morales, Evo. “Environmental Destruction is a Result of the Capitalist System.” socialistproject.ca. N.p., 17 Dec. 2014. Web. 19 July 2016.

Put your content for Tab 3 here.

Runa Ayllu (Community of Human Beings)

Insert Introductory text here

  1. History
  2. Economic
  3. Human Rights

Bolivia: A Chronology of Key Events
Citation: “Timeline: Bolivia.” BBC 2 Aug. 2012. bbc.co.uk. Web. 19 July 2016.

Put your content for Tab 2 here.

Oppressed but not defeated : peasant struggles among the Aymara and Qhechwa in Bolivia, 1900-1980
By Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui
Summary: Bolivian anthropologist and indigenous feminist activist Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui examines "the role that ethnicity plays in the emergence of social movements, its relation to the issue of long-term popular historical consciousness and memory as a factor in present-day struggles...[She] also touches upon the complex question of the role of external social actors who serve as catalysts in the rise of social movements with other political forces at the national level."
Citation:Rivera Cusicanqui, Silvia. Oppressed but Not Defeated : Peasant Struggles among the Aymara and Qhechwa in Bolivia, 1900-1980. Geneva: United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, 1987. Print. Report, no. 85.1; Report (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development), no. 85.1.

Red October left-indigenous struggles in modern Bolivia
By Jeffery R. Webber
Summary: Webber explores the period in Bolivian history from the Cochabamba Water Wars (2000-2003) through Evo Morales's presidency to 2010, and delineates five stages in the struggle between indigenous and neoliberal interests, ideologies, and systems.
Citation: Webber, Jeffery R. Red October : Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia. Leiden: Brill, 2011. Print. Historical materialism book series, v. 29; Historical materialism book series, v. 29.

"Amid Gas, Where Is the Revolution?
By Bret Gustafson
Citation:
Gustafson, Bret. "Amid Gas, Where Is The Revolution?." NACLA Report On The Americas 46.1 (2013): 61-66. Academic Search Complete. Web. 19 July 2016.

The Power of the Spectacle
By Benjamin Dangl
Summary: Dangl reports on the significance of Evo Morales's inauguration to his third term as President of Boliva and the ever-more apparent conflicts and complexities of an indigenous President who relies on extractivism to fund social services.
Citation Dangl, Benjamin. “The Power of the Spectacle: Evo Morales’ Inauguration in Tiwanaku, Bolivia.” N.p., 28 Jan. 2015. Web. 19 July 2016.

History 2240 Latin America - Guatemala INMP- John Paris

Welcome to History 2240 Latin America INMP Class Page

This research guide contains sources and tips on conducting research for your INMP project and negotiations.

You'll find resources containing background information and current information on Guatemala (and the broader Central American regions) as well as the other countries that will be represented at the INMP negotiations.

Below is a chart indicating the issues and the recommended types of sources

The Issues:

  • Refugee Human Rights
  • Women and children (girls) access to education
  • Climate Change (Paris Global Climate Change Agreement) – impact health, employment, industry

Perspectives from which to analyze the issues and suggested types of sources:

Note that these are suggestions - don't confine yourself to any single or type of resource.
Issues The issues (General overview) History of issue as related to Guatemala Current status of issue in Guatemala Viewpoint of other nations
Sources Encyclopedias, Books Encyclopedias, Books, Journals and Magazines, Newspapers, Websites Encyclopedias, Books, Journals and Magazines, Newspapers, Websites Encyclopedias, Books, Journals and Magazines, Newspapers, Websites

The other INMP countries and NGO

  • Haiti
  • Mexico
  • United States
  • Iran
  • India
  • Germany
  • Oxfam
  1. Books
  2. Databases & Newspapers
  3. Websites

Finding Books

Use the COD Library's book catalog to find books & videos. You'll need a current library card to check out books.

Search terms - finding the right ones.

If one search term doesn't work, don't give up, try another!

For example, In addition to searching for books on Climate Change, try Global Warming, or Greenhouse Gasses.

Searching for information on the country and issue

Try using the country name, followed by the issue.
Use Keyword search where possible.

Guatemala AND History
Guatemala AND Refugee
Guatemala AND Refugee AND "Human Rights"

Haiti AND Education
Haiti AND Education AND Women
Haiti AND Education AND Children

If COD Library doesn't have a book on your topic, try I-Share

I-Share

I-Share allows COD students to borrow books from over 80 Illinois academic libraries. You must have a current COD library card, and create an account to request books from an I-Share library.

E-book Collections
Most books in these collections can also be located and accessed by searching in the Library's book catalog.

  • ebrary
  • Collection contains many History-related books. Many e-books can be viewed from your computer or downloaded to your e-book reader. You need to create an account to download e-books to your device.

  • EBSCO e-book collection
  • Collection includes some books on History. NOTE: Books can be viewed by single page on a computer, or, can be downloaded to an e-book reader. You'll be prompted to create an EBSCO account. The loan period for e-books is four hours. Books can be renewed after the initial loan period expires.

  • Humanities (ACLS) E-book Collection
  • This resource includes over 1500 full-text, cross-searchable books in the humanities selected by scholars for their continuing importance for research and teaching. Pages from this collection can be printed and emailed.

Reference Works

Reference works, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are useful for learning about background information on a topic in History.

Please note that print reference books may be used while in the library only. Online reference books may be accessed from any on or off-campus computer. You'll need a library card to access online books and articles from off-campus.
Click on the links below to access the online book/website or record/description of the print book.

Encyclopedias

General Encyclopedia

Consider using these online encyclopedias as a first stop in getting background information on the countries and topics.

  • Credo Reference
  • Contains over 800 subject specific encyclopedias on a wide range of topics. When you do a search in Credo, it searches across all titles. You can limit search results by topic, but try and do a general search first as the most appropriate resources usually come display first.
  • Encyclopedia Britannica
  • World famous for it's extensive content on just about every topic under the sun.

  • Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL)
  • Similar to Credo, this database has over 100 encyclopedias on a wide range of topics.
Subject Specific Encyclopedias
Women and children (girls) access to education
Climate Change (Paris Global Climate Change Agreement) – impact on health, employment, industry

Databases

The Library subscribes to many databases that provide access to thousands of popular and credible, scholarly journals. Many databases provide access to full-text articles, while some provide information about the article only (citation). Request (for free!) through Interlibrary Loan copies of articles to which the Library doesn't have full-text access.

Databases are organized collections of information that you can search on a variety of fields, like title and author's name. iTunes is a database and so is Amazon. Even your contacts list in your phone is a type of mini database. The Library has databases of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals. We also have databases of streaming videos, music and e-books. The difference between our databases and iTunes or Amazon is that our stuff is free for you to use. You can browse the library's databases here: http://www.cod.edu/library/resources/subjectdb/

 

Databases - Best Bets

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • Academic OneFile
  • Multidisciplinary database covering a wide range of academic areas.

  • History Study Center
    Primary and secondary history collections providing access to rare British, American and world history sources, full text articles and reference materials. Includes multimedia sources.

  • Informe!
    Created exclusively for Spanish-speaking users, this full-text electronic reference tool is the first system to provide indexing, images and full text of popular Hispanic magazines -- not just translations. Also included is a thesaurus and interface that are uniquely designed for Spanish-speaking users.

  • JSTOR
  • Excellent source for credible scholarly, peer-reviewed articles. Articles in database were published between the early 1700s and between 1-5 years ago.

  • Project MUSE
  • Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

Encyclopedias

General Encyclopedia

Consider using these online encyclopedias as a first stop in getting background information on the countries and topics.

  • Credo Reference
  • Contains over 800 subject specific encyclopedias on a wide range of topics. When you do a search in Credo, it searches across all titles. You can limit search results by topic, but try and do a general search first as the most appropriate resources usually come display first.
  • Encyclopedia Britannica
  • World famous for it's extensive content on just about every topic under the sun.

  • Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL)
  • Similar to Credo, this database has over 100 encyclopedias on a wide range of topics.

Newspapers - Best Bets

  • Chicago Tribune (1849-1989) Proquest Historical Newspapers
  • Digital image of every issue of the Chicago Tribune (1849-1989), cover-to-cover

  • Chicago Tribune (1989-Present).
  • New York Times (1851-2009) Proquest Historical Newspapers
  • Digital image of every issue of the New York Times from 1851-2009, cover-to-cover.

  • New York Times 2009-Present.
  • Newspaper Source
  • Provides selected full text for 23 national (U.S.) and international newspapers, including USA Today, The Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post, The Times (London), The Toronto Star, etc. The database also contains selected full text from nearly 200 regional (U.S.) newspapers, including The Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune, The Detroit Free Press, The Miami Herald, The New York Daily News, The San Jose Mercury News, etc. In addition, full text television & radio news transcripts are provided from CBS News, FOX News, NPR, etc.

  • Wall Street Journal
  • Indexing and full-text articles from the world's leading financial newspaper from 1984-present.

  • Washington Post (1998-Present)
  • The full text of the Washington Post 1998-Present.


    Websites

    Who can publish on the Internet? Anyone.

    You may find a website by doing a web search or through a recommendation of another student. Before you use a website for your assignment, you should evaluate the webpage for credibility, reliability, authority and purpose. Check out the CRAP Test for more information on evaluating websites.

    ICONS Research Library
    The ICONS Research Library is designed to help students prepare for their participation in the ICONS' internationally-focused simulations. In particular, these resources are intended to increase participants' familiarity with their assigned countries or roles, as well as the issues over which they will be negotiating. Students conducting research on a particular country or international issue for other assignments may also find these resources helpful.

    Refugee Human Rights
    Women and children (girls) access to education
    Climate Change (Paris Global Climate Change Agreement) – impact health, employment, industry

    The Day of the Dead

    278096984_5b0d9d5c4d_z-2.jpg
    "Day of the Dead on cafe window," Señor Codo, Creative Commons, 2006

    Celebration, history, spiritualism, and culture

    The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday celebration of honoring spirits of dead people who come to visit the physical world on October 31—children come on November 1st and adults on the 2nd. It’s origins are a Christian-indigenous mix, with roots in Catholicism and Mesoamerican religions. Activities include Mass and feasts at graveyards. The day is similar to the Euro-American Halloween in aesthetics but has a different emphasis and feel; for example, it's not a day to be scared of dead people or be afraid of ghosts, but to greet any ghost you may encounter as a friend. Images of loved ones and indigenous persons are often venerated next to codified religious saints and divine beings. There were times when holiday-related images became political satire motifs. It’s a way for people to celebrate cultural identity and maintain their heritage while away from their ancestral homeland.

    Research Guide Prepared by Joshua Snyder, Dominican University GSLIS Practicum Student

    Search Terms

    Search terms are words and phrases that help you think about your topic in different ways, and they help you in your research. The list below are some search term ideas that can narrow or broaden your research. You can get it to get your brainstorm on and for putting on search boxes in database search engines:

    Mexico
    America
    United States
    Politics
    Religion
    Spiritualism
    Catholicism
    Food
    Art
    Culture
    Aztec
    Cartoons
    Tattoos
    Family
    Relatives
    Syncretism
    Subversion
    Colonialism

    JSTOR Articles

    Stanley Brandes, “Sugar, Colonialism, and Death: On the Origins of Mexico's Day of the Dead”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/179316
    Provides an historical overview of religious practices and connects with social identity currently.

    Stanley Brandes, “The Day of the Dead, Halloween, and the Quest for Mexican National Identity”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/541045
    Good for comparing the traditional Mexican holiday with the European spiritualism we have in America today and how each element forms cultural identity.

    Betty Brown, “Vive tu Recuerdo: Living Traditions in the Mexican Days of the Dead”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/3335859
    A type of catalogue for activities and beliefs regarding the holiday.

    Olivia Cadaval, ‘"The Taking of the Renwick": The Celebration of the Day of the Dead and the Latino Community in Washington, D. C.’ | http://www.jstor.org/stable/3814391
    A place study good for comparing practices and ideas in one location in the United States with another location in the Americas (which would require another source).

    Neal Krause, Elena Bastida, “Exploring the Interface between Religion and Contact with the Dead among Older Mexican Americans”. | http://www.jstor.org/stable/25593769
    Study of a specific demographic regarding necro-communication; good for dialogue with Day of the Dead practices.

    Project MUSE Articles

    Katarzyna Mikulska Dąbrowska, “"Secret language" in oral and graphic form: religious-Magic Discourse in Aztec speeches and manuscripts”
    | https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
    Although the title doesn’t name the celebration, this study includes the Day of the Dead by engaging with ways cultures preserve tradition, and may provide prototypes from ancient civilizations for current practices.

    Pamela Bastante and Brenton Dickieson, “Nuestra Señora de las Sombras: the enigmatic identity of Santa Muerte”
    | https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
    This article discusses quasi-divine Santa Muerte, a prominent figure in Day of the Dead spiritualism.

    Linda Greenberg, “Learning from the dead: wounds, women, and activism in Cherríe Moraga’s Heroes and saints”
    | https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/melus/v0...
    Analyzing a play, Greenburg discusses the way persons used images of death to communicate rebellion against oppression from colonial, economic, and sexist forms; although not explicitly naming the holiday, this is a concrete example of public experience of death and identity formation.

    Regina Marchi, “Hybridity and Authenticity in US Day of the Dead Celebrations”
    | https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
    Arguments concerning multiple celebrations in various locations and comparing them to what the author considers “authentic”.

    Carleen D. Sanchez, “The apotheosis of Frida and Ché: secular saints and fetishized commodities”
    | https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_...
    Frida, a figure representing pre-European Central America, often features in Day of the Dead iconography, and Che represents modern struggles for liberty; this is good for seeing how icons of national identity such as these are turned into objects for profit, and how that change damages cultural identity.

    COD Books

    Stanley Brandes, Skulls to the living, bread to the dead: the day of the dead in Mexico and beyond
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/64208213
    This provides a history and coverage of practices, including art and spiritualism, of the holy day, in Mexico and other countries.

    Elizabeth Carmichael and Chloë Sayer, The skeleton at the feast: the Day of the Dead in Mexico
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/25177425
    This is an overview of the holy day’s history and is exclusive to Mexico.

    Janet Esser, Behind the mask in Mexico
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/17295550
    This focuses on the costumes used in Mexico to show the holiday activities and its history.

    John Greenleigh, The days of the dead: Mexico's festival of communion with the departed
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/38030302
    Greenleigh expounds the identity Mexicans cultivate by keeping close relationships with dead community members.

    Carol Gnojewski, Day of the Dead: a Latino celebration of family and life
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/55086013
    This exposition includes practices, a little history, and is demonstrates how pan-national identity is built with the celebration in the Latin@ community.

    Shawn D Haley, Day of the Dead: when two worlds meet in Oaxaca
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/52269678
    Haley studies the people in Oaxaca and shows their beliefs about the world, moving into their practices of the Day of the Dead, demonstrating the relationship that the people in Oaxaca have with dead community members through time.

    Jack Santino, Halloween and other festivals of death and life
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/28549780
    Santino compares the religious beliefs and common practices of Halloween with the Day of the Dead, regardless of location or ethnic group.

    John Lynch, New worlds : a religious history of Latin America
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/757838308
    Lynch provides a history of Latin America’s religious phenomena, which is more broad than most of these sources but a bit more focused than Roof’s book.

    Regina M Marchi, Day of the Dead in the USA : the migration and transformation of a cultural phenomenon
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/17295550
    A cultural and historical exposition that shows how immigration of Latin Americans keep their identity in a foreign nation through practicing the Day of the Dead.

    Wade Roof, Contemporary American religion
    | http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/38030302
    Roof provides an overarching summary of major American religious beliefs and practices; very introductory but can help give a basic idea of each religion for comparison.

    Websites

    “Day of the Dead Educational Activity Guide,” Mexic-Arte Museum
    | http://www.mexic-artemuseum.org/images/uploads/education/Day_of_Dead_Guide.pdf
    Provides a short curriculum of activities and sources for educating children about the Day.

    “The Day of the Dead ofrenda: a heartfelt work of art,” Inside Mexico
    | http://www.inside-mexico.com/ofrenda.htm
    Exposition of a particular popular traditional object of religious significance created just before and for the Day.

    “Dia de los Muertos,” National Geographic
    | http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/media/dia-de-los-muert...
    A good introduction to the history and practices of the Day of the Dead.

    “Calaveras of José Guadalupe Posada,” Political Domain Review
    | http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/the-calaveras-of-jose-guadalup...
    Demonstrates how religious symbolism became a powerful tool in the hands of an artist to make political statements—a case study of one artist.

    “Day of the Dead honors the deceased: holiday’s focus different than Halloween’s,” About Education
    | http://www.press.uchicago.edu/books/turabian/turabian_citationguide.html
    Provides a brief overview of the differences between Halloween and Day of the Dead, focusing on family member relationships.

    “A Mexican Day of the Dead party,” Fine Cooking
    | http://www.finecooking.com/menus/day-of-the-dead.aspx
    Gives a menu with traditional cuisine.

    “Altar images: US Day of the Dead as political communication,” eScholarship University of California
    | http://escholarship.org/uc/item/8574v2sk#page-1
    Concerned with only the US, Marchi shows how Day of the Dead images play a political role in a community.

    Mexican Sugar Skull
    | http://www.mexicansugarskull.com
    Focusing on one Day of the Dead candy image, this website is dedicated to the holiday’s art and food tradition.

    Other Materials

    Jorge Alderete, Day of the Dead: El Dia de Los Muertos, Korero: Chicago, 2011.
    | http://www.ipgbook.com/the-day-of-the-dead-products-9781907621017.php?pa...

    Mary J. Andrade, Through the eyes of the soul, Day of the Dead in Mexico, Michoacan. 1996.
    | http://www.dayofthedead.com/through-the-eyes-of-the-soul-day-of-the-dead...

    Mary Andrade, The Vigil of the Little Angels” in P’urhepecha and Spanish, Special Edition
    | http://www.dayofthedead.com/the-vigil-of-the-little-angels-in-p-urhepech...

    Phil Cushway, Art of the dead
    | http://www.amazon.com/Art-Dead-Phil-Cushway/dp/1593765029

    Day of the dead 2.jpg
    "Noche de Muertos" by Ute Hagen, Creative Commons, artist copyright 2009

    Illinois Periodical Database

    https://www.lib.niu.edu/perlist.html
    Description: 

    The Illinois Periodicals Online collection includes: Illinois Country Living, Illinois Heritage, Illinois History : A Magazine for Young People, Illinois History Teacher, Illinois Issues, Illinois Libraries, Illinois Municipal Review, Illinois Parks & Recreation, and Outdoor Illinois. Date ranges vary as they are constantly being updated by the archivists at Northern Illinois University.

    Coverage: 
    Varies
    Off-campus Availability: 
    Students, Faculty, and Staff
    Full-text Content: 
    Includes full-text content
    This is a trial: 
    No
    Suppress: 
    No

    Artstor

    https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://library.artstor.org/
    Description: 

    The Artstor Digital Library is a nonprofit resource that provides over 1.6 million digital images in the arts, architecture, humanities, and sciences with an accessible suite of software tools for teaching and research. Collections are used for teaching and study in a wide range of subject areas, including art, architecture, music, religion, anthropology, literature, world history, American Studies, Asian Studies, Classical Studies, Medieval Studies, Renaissance Studies, and more.
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
    Artstor is more than art: www.artstor.org/subjectguides
    Artstor Mobile: www.artstor.org/mobile

    Off-campus Availability: 
    Students, Faculty, and Staff
    Full-text Content: 
    Includes full-text content
    Note: 

    Some areas of Artstor require the user to "double-click" to get to materials.

    This is a trial: 
    No
    Suppress: 
    No

    Project Muse

    https://cod.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://muse.jhu.edu/search

    To limit your searches to the journals available through the COD Library, check the "Only content I have full access to" box on the left side of your results page.

    Description: 

    Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 500+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

    Off-campus Availability: 
    Students, Faculty, and Staff
    Full-text Content: 
    Includes full-text content
    This is a trial: 
    No
    Suppress: 
    No

    Pages

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